tartary buckwheat


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tartary buckwheat

[′tärd·ə·rē ′bək‚wēt]
(botany)
One of three buckwheat species grown commercially; the leaves are narrower than the other two species and arrow-shaped, and the flowers are smaller with inconspicuous greenish-white sepals. Also known as duck wheat; hulless buckwheat; rye buckwheat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Case study: quantification of quercetin in Tartary buckwheat
Phenolics content and antioxidant activity of tartary buckwheat from different locations.
Its two main species are common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) and tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.), world widely consumed, because of both seeds and sprouts are rich in nutrients, minerals and phenolic compounds (Kim et al., 2001; Marton et al., 2010).
The following is a list of the common names: sweet buckwheat or common buckwheat, Tartary buckwheat or bitter buckwheat (English), Mithe Phaper for common buckwheat, Tite Phaper for Tartary buckwheat (Nepali), er chi for common buckwheat, er ka for Tartary buckwheat (Chinese), Ogal for common buckwheat, Phaper for Tartary buckwheat (India), Jare for common and bjo for Tartary buckwheat (Bhutan), and Soba in Japan [6].
Anti-inflammatory effects of common and tartary buckwheat sprout extracts rich in flavonoids was comparatively investigated in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 and primary peritoneal macrophages.
The wild ancestor of cultivated common buckwheat, and of tartary buckwheat. Economic Botany 52: 123-133.
Canola (Brassica rapa) plant density influences Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum) interference, biomass, and seed yield.
In particular, tartary buckwheat has also been found to have several beneficial pharmacological and biological effects, such as anticancer, antidiabetic, and antioxidant activities [15-17].
(2005) observed an increase in the flavonoids content in tartary buckwheat [Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn], when submitted to stress conditions (UV radiation and desiccation), suggesting that flavonoids might be considered as starters of the plant defense system for some species.
Buckwheat works mostly for noodles (although Tartary buckwheat can be made into a flour for baking some non-yeast breadstuffs).
"Now it's becoming difficult to grow drought-resistant crops like maize, peanuts and tartary buckwheat," he said.