tau protein


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Related to tau protein: Alzheimer disease

tau protein

[′tau̇ ‚prō‚tēn]
(neuroscience)
A protein found in the axons of healthy neurons, where it binds to other proteins called microtubules to form the cytoskeleton of the neuron and provide the tracks over which material can be transported from one part of the neuron to another.
References in periodicals archive ?
31,[5] comprising 16 exons that are alternatively spliced on exons 2, 3, and 10 to generate 6 tau protein isoforms ranging from 352 to 441 amino acids in the adult human brain[6] [Figure 1].
Research into drugs targeting Tau protein is also facing difficulties.
Tauopathies are neurodegenerative conditions characterized by a pathologic accumulation of insoluble intraneuronal aggregates of tau proteins (Figure 1) leading to various frontotemporal dementias.
The tau fragment, which is produced when caspase-2 cuts the full-length tau protein at a specific location, was also found at higher levels in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients compared to healthy individuals of the same age.
Hippocampal volume was again assessed by MRI; positron emission tomography scans were used to assess amyloid deposition, but also regional brain tau protein levels and other pathologies, and there was serial cognitive testing.
The disease is characterized by degradation of brain tissue and the accumulation of tau protein, causing symptoms such as memory loss, aggression, confusion and deep depression that generally appear years after initial brain trauma.
In addition, tau entanglement is also associated with AD and consists of insoluble hyperphosphorylated tau protein in the intracellular space.
Tau protein abnormalities are also found in other fatal neurodegenerative diseases causing dementia or movement disorders.
Neurodegeneration and proper and pathological protein folding are covered in general terms, followed by focus on the tau protein and its propensity to misfold.
Cultured neurons from human patients with Alzheimer's exhibit elevated levels of the toxic form of amyloid found in plaques and the abnormal version of the tau protein that makes up tangles, but not actual plaques and tangles.
The patient-derived cells also had high amounts of the tau protein, or more accurately tau that has been distorted so that the proteins tangle together.