taxel


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taxel

(TActile piXEL) A sensor that recognizes the pressure of contact with a physical object. Used in robotic devices, taxels can determine how much force is being applied to an area by a human finger or hand or even a non-human object.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since no additional Integrated Circuits (ICs) with cumbersome package are used for the conditioning electronics, the types of components to mount on the flexible PCB, for each taxel, are only three and small enough to maintain an high flexibility of the PCB.
As Nelson Taxel, CEO of Positive Promotions stated, “having this merchandise that can be made here in the United States, there are people waiting in the promotional products business that can make all of these different things and to us this bill would be a tremendous boost and as we would increase our business and increase employment.”
In addition to Joel Taxel's "Marketing" in the Routledge Handbook of Research, Brian Alderson, Andrea Immel, and Deborah Stevenson do discuss marketing concerns in the Cambridge Companion, as does June Cummins uniquely in Keywords in her piece specifically on "Marketing" and Margaret Mackey uniquely in the Routledge Companion in her essay on "Media Adaptations." Mackey says quite rightly that "material conditions ...
These touch-sensitive transistors - dubbed "taxels" - could provide significant improvements in resolution, sensitivity and active/adaptive operations compared to existing techniques for tactile sensing.
Teachers, librarians, and parents must offer enthusiastic assistance to children in discovering the best books to embrace (Taxel, 2002).
Taxel of the University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington.
Following directions comprised the "main part" of the assessment for the students' projects and presentations; students were thus rewarded for their demonstrations of character as envisioned in the low-track curriculum (see Smagorinsky & Taxel, 2005, for an account of the ways in which a character curriculum is often aimed at normalizing the behavior of low-income students according to middle-class values).
Third, a large part of each class session was devoted to whole-class and small-group discussions where TESs had the opportunity to engage in sharing their voices and listening to others' voices, particularly through reading and responding to culturally relevant children's literature (Dillard 1997; Gollnick, 1992; Klassen-Endrizzi & Ruiz, 1995; Pinsent, 1997; Taxel, 1989).
Research has shown that children's literature is an important part of children's construction of reality (Taxel 1989).
A conservative political climate has engendered defense of the traditional literary canon and attacks on including multicultural literature as no more than politically correct advocacy (Taxel, 1997).
Smagorinsky and Taxel analyze the ways in which the issue of character education has been articulated in the US, both historically and in the current character education movement that began in the 1990s.