taxpayer

(redirected from taxpaying)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial.

taxpayer

A building, often temporary, which yields a minimal return on investment, usually little more than real estate taxes.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the banking association, the studies "have documented that taxpaying banks do a far better job of reaching underserved consumers than credit unions, despite the credit union subsidy that costs Wisconsin taxpayers at least $40 million and at least $2 billion nationally.
NLC and other national local government organizations denounced the FCC's action, which will undermine local authority to act to protect the taxpaying public, their public fights of way, and their public safety.
In this paper, I argue that certain "typical" occurrences outside of a given taxable year should be taken into account in determining a taxpaying unit's income tax liability for such year.
God forbid Coach Houston Nutt and Frank Broyles pay car sales taxes like the rest of taxpaying citizens.
These are hardworking, taxpaying individuals," she says.
Entering 2005, the recycling and reuse of construction and demolition materials remains a viable and growing industry that provides taxpaying jobs and profits in an environmentally friendly industry.
Since he started his campaign, Flannelly has helped turn tens of thousands of young illegals into taxpaying green-card holders.
2]O, and the taxpaying citizens of this Orange County community are especially fond of drinking it, cooking with it, and bathing in it.
Omitted is any acknowledgement that, if permitted, private enterprise might achieve comparable advances in space exploration with greater efficiency and at no cost to the taxpaying public.
Credits can be designed to benefit a large percentage of the taxpaying public," Neuschler explains.
Representatives of the Professional Ethics Executive Committee have met with GAO officials to discuss how AICPA independence standards protect the taxpaying public in the Yellow Book environment.
Some folks at the Treasury, especially Undersecretary John Taylor, believe they have found a "new approach" for dealing with emerging market debt problems without compromising the interests of taxpaying American "plumbers and carpenters," as Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill put it.