technical evaluation


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technical evaluation

[′tek·nə·kəl i‚val·yə′wā·shən]
(engineering)
The study and investigation to determine the technical suitability of material, equipment, or a system.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A primer for organizing a technical evaluation consists of starting with a summary paragraph, briefly describing the work and any unique aspects to the contractor's proposal.
The revision may result in the need for a secondary technical evaluation, which would include an assessment of the revised proposal.
The technical evaluation must be able to stand as an independent document during negotiations, substantiating the government's position for exceptions to the contractor's proposal.
It is important for the technical evaluation to answer the question: "What is the basis for the difference?" The evaluation should be substantiated with facts and also explain the differences in estimates.
The technical evaluation should be summarized to the level of detail commensurate with the proposal structure--coordinated within the program office and with the price analyst--and with the objective to assist contract negotiations.
The technical evaluation must be clear and show the reference page in the proposal, the cost element, the proposed amount, the recommended position, and the explanation for the recommendation or exception.
CONSOLIDATION OF THE ELEMENTS FOR THE TECHNICAL EVALUATION
The technical evaluation should be summarized to the level of detail commensurate with the proposal structure, coordinated within the program office and with the price analyst, with the objective of assisting the contract negotiator in establishing a reasonable position for negotiations.
The above discussion sets the stage for examining how to write a technical evaluation. The technical evaluation is written by the program's lead evaluator and reviewed by the program office's division-level engineer.
The same holds true when the evaluator, in a technical evaluation, determines a government position based on engineering judgment.
The technical evaluation should only substantially reduce a task if it is not a valid task.
The relationship of the buyer and the seller is usually adversarial, with the contractor defending the proposal estimate being evaluated in the technical evaluation. The contractor will defend the estimate by questioning your judgment, your intelligence, and your conclusions in the technical evaluation--questioning the technical evaluation elements should have already been accomplished during fact-finding so the conclusions of the technical evaluation are not surprising to the contractor.

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