technophilia


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technophilia

A love of computers and high-tech gadgets. Contrast with technophobia. See technophile.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oppositional Technophilia. Social Epistemology: A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy, 23:1, 79-86.
More than depicting technophilia, then, Pylon, this paper argues, is a critique of a capitalist culture increasingly devoid of such passion and appreciation for creativity as demonstrated by the barnstormers.
Created during a time of techno-phobia (post-A-bomb devastation) and technophilia (the national push to build nuclear power plants, automotive assembly lines, and an ultramodern freeway system), threats of censorship by autocratic one-party rule, far-left resistance, and an Argentine publishing marketplace trying to hold at bay the onslaught of US superhero comics, Oesterheld and Solano Lopez created an epic odyssey that follows the adventures of protagonist Juan Salvo (The Eternaut) and his cadre of fallible compadres as they use their wits and technical skills to defend earth against an intergalactic alien invasion out to obliterate human life--and to transform those left into robotic slaves.
Art historian Anne Collins Goodyear convincingly blames its flop on Americans' changing perception of technology from one of technophilia in 1957 to technophobia by 1971.
At the same time, they subject transhumanism to a wry sense of humor, for example, by depicting "the transhumanist movement as a wild and wacky expression of the madness of late capitalism." In addition, they put the technophilia of today into historical context by raising the cases of eugenics, the L5 societies for advocating the colonization of space, and other ideas that embodied more hope than sense.
This is not, however, to unconditionally posit a drab decelerationist program against the excitement of a futural technophilia, but to reconfigure the terms on which the debate takes place and to serve as a reminder that there are counter-histories to a narrative of relentlessness that at times sees technology as detached from energy and the consumption of energy (usually of finite resources), as if technology is somehow autonomous and self-moving.
Critics such as Benjamin Buchloh have considered their works and ideas problematic, equally for their technophilia and apparent disconnection from history.
We also appreciate her serious discussions on the role of science in national development and its influence on literary history, the impact of Darwin's theories on literary production and the cultural imagination, and the tension between technophilia and technophobia, among other matters.
In this dismal scenario of a failing agricultural policy built on "export maximization, productivism, technophilia and input maximization," Qualman sees the logic of food sovereignty reaffirmed.
At other moments, Mac Low is able to suspend multiple vocabularies within a single poetic thrust, as in Number 114 ("Root & Branches Sensibly Old-Fashioned"): "insistent on scattering networking clumps over curlicue surfaces swathed in cinnamon / sophism foundering in data." This line fuses voluptuous organicism with technophilia, producing heteroglot descriptions that have a certain intuitiveness despite not existing in time and space (networks don't have clumps, and surfaces can't really form curlicues).
Richard and Toby document the enormous environmental and social damage caused by the growth of the digital economy, and argue that this receives much less attention than might be expected because of our wider technophilia, and the continuing lure of i-gadgetry.
Scruton notes the alienating nature of the contemporary world, and holds "conservatives" partly responsible: "If the addictive [technological] culture seems to be so resistant to opposition, this is partly because of the reluctance of conservatives to condemn it--seeing consumerism and technophilia as integral to the 'market solutions' that must be protected from the socialist state.