technophobia


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Related to technophobia: technophilia

technophobia

A fear of computers and high-tech gadgets. Contrast with technophilia. See technophobe.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The third element of technophobia is a nefarious one: Protectionism.
Lessons learned for both type of companies is that shortening adoption time and even technophobia have to be taken account already in the beginning product development process.
Using layering, sound manipulation, effect processing and heavy sampling, their music harkens to the early days of EBM (electronic body music) and darkwave, with Katie Petix's vocals and their pop- centric songwriting giving Technophobia its defining sound.
After his retirement from active politics he pursued interests he hadn't previously had time for, like learning the piano and overcoming his technophobia about email.
"Our society is overly prone towards both technophobia and fear and condemnation of sex," said David Ley, author of (https://www.amazon.com/Addiction-forthcoming-Ethical-Responsible-Pleasure/dp/1442213051) The Myth of Sex Addiction , to (http://motherboard.vice.com/read/is-sexting-addiction-a-real-thing?utm_source=mbtwitter) Motherboard .
Art historian Anne Collins Goodyear convincingly blames its flop on Americans' changing perception of technology from one of technophilia in 1957 to technophobia by 1971.
First episode Technophobia sees mankind losing its ability to use technology; second story Time Reaver is set on a mechanical planet.
Neuroticism was found to correlate strongly with technophobia while openness and extraversion correlated negatively with technophobia.
Applebaum thinks so, arguing that the trend toward technophobia exposes "adults' reluctance to embrace the changing face of childhood and the shift in the power dynamic which accompanies this change." Viewed through its attitudes about technology, she writes, "literature aimed at young people is exposed afresh as problematic, a socialization agent serving adults' agenda." Certain adults' agenda, to be sure.