tectonic plate


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tectonic plate

[tek′tän·ik ′plāt]
(geology)
Any one of the internally rigid crustal blocks of the lithosphere which move horizontally across the earth's surface relative to one another. Also known as crustal plate.
References in periodicals archive ?
What's uncommon to hear is how these tectonic plates "die," or at least, how they stop from shifting to and fro.
The problem with this list is the fourth elaboration, because the idea that convection currents in the mantle drive the movement of tectonic plates is a myth.
But my hunch is that capitalism's tectonic plates can only shift when the reformers and the protesters start to talk with one another.
Further, a 5[degrees] rectangular grid was created for each tectonic plate and for each grid point (except the four above mentioned plates which were not considered) the horizontal velocity was determined using the equation (1).
They will then use another robot to collect rock samples from the volcanoes, which will be dated to shed light on the timescales behind the growth of the Earth's crust and the tectonic plates.
"We are not any- where near a tectonic plate margin in the UK, in fact the nearest one is in Iceland.
The Northeast Pacific Time-Series Undersea Networked Experiments (NEPTUNE) Program is an ambitious plan to wire an entire tectonic plate off the Pacific Northwest with sensors delivering real-time data from above and below the sea floor.
Tectonic plates will shift again, here and elsewhere, on our flawed planet, without discriminating between nationalities.
However, its influence on tectonic plate activity still remains intact, except at a much reduced pace.
Our Earth's crust is made up of tectonic plates that look like giant pieces of a jigsaw puzzle (as you can see in the picture above).
The scientists on this study used computer models to figure out whether the moon's structure would allow for tectonic plate movement like that and whether subduction can occur on the ice-covered moon.
There, the Indian tectonic plate presses continually northward into the Eurasian tectonic plate, giving rise to the highest mountains on Earth--and deadly earthquakes, such as the one in 2015 that killed more than 9,000 people in Nepal.