tectosilicate

tectosilicate

[¦tek·tō′sil·ə‚kāt]
(mineralogy)
A structural type of silicate in which all four oxygen atoms of the silicate tetrahedra are shared with neighboring tetrahedra; tectosilicates include quartz, the feldspars, the feldspathoids, and zeolites. Also known as framework silicate.
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper showed a successful case for using silicate minerals in groups of inosilicate and tectosilicate to produce the geopolymeric binder.
(26) 3MLS has quartz particles, whose spatial orientation can be described as a crystalline solid network of interconnected Si[O.sub.4] tetrahedra and classified as tectosilicate. Conversely, the other tested materials consisted predominantly of glass, whose silica (Si[O.sub.2]) structures have an amorphous (non-crystalline) orientation.
Plagioclase is a common series of aluminosilicate (tectosilicate) minerals within the feldspar family.
Albite is a plagioclase feldspar mineral and stilbite is a series of tectosilicate minerals of the zeolite group.
In the tectosilicate structure of quartz, in which there is no center of symmetry, enantiomorphism results from how the tetrahedral Si[O.sub.4] polyhedra connect, at their points, to form helical chains, which, like spiral staircases, turn either clockwise or counterclockwise.
When you enter it, the database automatically completes the name, enters the mineral group (such as feldspars), if any, the crystal system, the chemical class (such as tectosilicate), and the chemistry (K aluminosilicate).
Green River Westerly Mineral group shale granite Carbonates (%) 51.8 0 Tectosilicates (%) 45.9 5 Phyllosilicates (%) 2.3 95 Reference [21] [34] Green River Westerly Mechanical property shale granite Young's modulus (GPa) 3.2-3.8 76 Poisson ratio 0.345-0.365 0.27 Reference [35] [36]
In the past, zeolites were limited to tectosilicates and tetrahedrons containing aluminum and silicon.
In one way the organization here is conventional, the chapters moving in Dana order from native elements through tectosilicates, to end at last with opal, a non-crystalline "mineraloid." But there is much more history along the way.
Nitric acid-extractable K represents exchangeable K plus some K extracted from within phyllosilicate and tectosilicates mineral structures.
These data are consistent with a dissolution-precipitation process in tectosilicates, but it is very similar to that of the montmorillonite transformation.
The minerals ranged into groups I (micas) and II (tectosilicates) contain alkaline metals strongly bonded in the mineral structure while in minerals ranged into groups III (smectites) and IV (zeolites) the alkaline metals are weakly bonded in the interlayer and in the structure channels, respectively.