Boredom

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Boredom

See also Futility.
Aldegonde, Lord St.
bored nobleman, empty of pursuits. [Br. Lit.: Lothair]
Baudelaire, Charles
(1821–1867) French poet whose dissipated lifestyle led to inner despair. [Fr. Lit.: NCE, 248]
Bovary, Emma
housewife suffers from ennui. [Fr. Lit.: Madame Bovary]
Des Esseintes, Jean
in dissipation and isolation, develops morbid ennui. [Fr. Lit.: Against the Grain]
Harthouse, James
thorough gentleman, weary of everything. [Br. Lit.: Hard Times]
Oblomov, Ilya
Russian landowner; embodiment of physical and mental sloth. [Russ. Lit.: Oblomov]
Povey, Constance Baines
uneventful thoughts, marriage best described as routine. [Br. Lit.: The Old Wives’ Tale, Magill I, 684–686]
References in periodicals archive ?
The performances of Tedium and its companion in the theater and in the classroom together offer a distinctive opportunity for investigating the tension between and interpenetration of magic and disillusion, absorption and distraction, play and labor.
While Charles Jencks may state that big is boring in his theory that measures design tedium against floor areas (AR August 2002), it cannot be denied that Foster and Partners' 30 St Mary Axe is an impressive sight.
There was, it seemed, a flurry of celebrity deaths in the 1990s, a short surge of activism, a brief flirtation with miracle cures subsiding to the tedium of long-term medication and then the West moved on to other things.
Instead, writer-director Max Farberbock's overlong film veers from confusion to tedium and back,
Although Smiley spends a lot of time illustrating the sins of being politically passive, this tedium brings a specific message.
Thus, despite occasional and perhaps inevitable stretches of tedium as the evidence of book lists and prosopographical research is being put on display, Cormack's study out performs the promise of its title and provides a welcome complement to the close readings of particular geographical texts that have dominated recent work in this area.
Among his more vivid depictions we have Rika, a bright high schooler whose addiction to crack cocaine horrifies her middle-class family even as it renders her increasingly oblivious to the downward spiral of her life - "What I don't understand is how I feel," she complains at one point - and Sally, a sober young Christian woman whose life script seems already to have dead-ended in the tedium of a data entry job and to whom circumstance offers an unexpected moment of both trial and also potential transcendence when she encounters the pregnant girl who had killed her brother.
Nightly teach-ins eased the tedium of the ninety-seven-hour protest.
Then, and only then, may you be close to the experience that is The League Against Tedium.
Sometimes I wonder what my nurses find more frustrating -- the old right/left confusion or the tedium of listening to five minutes of my instructions in order to make an adjustment that takes only a few seconds.
Nixon: The Triumph of a Politician, 1962-1972 The press has lately gone anniversary-mad, making up for the tedium of domestic peace and (relative) prosperity by commemorating such colorful events of the recent past as Woodstock and the Apollo moon landing.
Agilent's Deconvolution Reporting Software (DRS) eliminates most of the delay and tedium from the review of GC/MS data.