telescope structure

telescope structure

[′tel·ə‚skōp ‚strək·chər]
(geology)
An alluvial fan structure characterized by younger fans with flatter gradients spreading out between older fans with steeper gradients.
References in periodicals archive ?
This milestone marked the beginning of the construction of the dome and main telescope structure of the worlds biggest optical telescope, and ushered in a new era in astronomy.
The telescope structure and its drive system were designed by engineers in Germany and South Africa, and produced in Namibia and Germany.
Issues such as the thermal expansion of the telescope structure, and its flexion as the telescope slewed across the sky, introduced errors into the shape of the mirror which had to be painstakingly corrected for.
During an observation the telescope structure is stationary and the huge eight ton tracker beam together with the payload, which is carried on a six-legged hexapod system, get moved and slowly rotates to compensate for the Earth's rotation, at the same time keeping the SAC within 10 microns and exactly perpendicular to the mirror segment directly below it at that instant.
Once the optics were completed, the next step was to build the telescope structure.
The telescope structure and the mirrors are made of silicon carbide, which provides very high optical stability and minimises thermo-elastic deformation, resulting in an excellent geometric image quality.
A fan pulls air through the telescope structure and primary mirror, and we exhaust the warm air alongside the icehouse.
The installation of the mirrors onto the telescope structure is performed by Harris Corporation, a subcontractor to Northrop Grumman.
Surprisingly, the telescope structure can accommodate such an upgrade without major modifications.
Using a robotic arm reminiscent of a claw machine, the team meticulously installed all of Webb's primary mirror segments onto the telescope structure.
Mounting the secondary mirror on an optical window of high quality will significantly reduce turbulence in and around the telescope structure, thus increasing the chances that the instrument will approach its diffraction limit during less-than-ideal seeing.