teleprinter

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teleprinter

1. a telegraph apparatus consisting of a keyboard transmitter, which converts a typed message into coded pulses for transmission along a wire or cable, and a printing receiver, which converts incoming signals and prints out the message See also telex radioteletype
2. a network of such devices, formerly used for communicating information, etc.
3. a similar device used for direct input/output of data into a computer at a distant location

teleprinter

[′tel·ə‚print·ər]
(computer science)
Any typewriter-type device capable of being connected to a computer and of printing out a set of messages under computer control.

teleprinter

A typewriter-like terminal with a keyboard and built-in printer. It can be a desktop or portable unit. Teleprinters were quite common years ago as input terminals for computers, but have given way to the video screen. Teleprinter-like devices are still used in retail applications where receipts are necessary.


The Teleprinter
Teleprinters were widely used starting with the very first computers. They lived well into the 1970s as a computer input device. Any keyboard and printing unit can be called a teleprinter.








Paper Tape on a Teleprinter
Paper tape was widely used on teleprinters to record incoming data. The reel of tape in this picture is on the lower left side of the unit. (Image courtesy of General Electric Company.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Using a special teletype machine, the media fed information to major world capitals.
The printer might have been a Teletype machine running at 110 baud (10 characters per second).
My only connection to the computer was a teletype machine in which I entered instructions to the computer in the octal numbering system (those of you who are mathematically inclined should have some concept of communicating in this way).
Next to a Teletype machine is the bulletin sent over the UPI wire at 12:34 P.M.: "Three shots were fired at President Kennedy's motorcade today in downtown Dallas." On a video screen, a shaken Walter Cronkite announces, "From Dallas, Texas--the flash apparently official--President Kennedy died at 1 P.M."
Other well-known boiler room tricks Rose's yakkers used included clicking a stapler to sound like a teletype machine sending up-to-the-minute market information, and putting the phone and the phoner's head into a desk drawer to get an echo effect while claiming to be in the vault with the investor's precious metal.
Meanwhile, back in Eugene, fans filled the McDonald Theater, where a teletype machine would report the ebbs and flows of the game, which would later be re-created in a radio broadcast.
I thought it very cool that I could peck a few lines of English-like instructions into a teletype machine and seconds later a mainframe computer somewhere on campus would calculate precinct-level vote percentages for my American Government homework.
"It was a pretty primitive newsroom, pretty minimal with a typewriter, United Press teletype machine and a phone," he continued.
Known as the Creed Teletype machine, it was originally the brain child of Frederick George Creed, a resident of Nova Scotia.
Nine minutes later, Walter Cronkite and other anchormen ripped the report clacking out at 60 words per minute on the UPI teletype machine in their offices and relayed it to the world.
(Modems were extremely expensive then, but if you got a chip and you wrote some code you could make one yourself.) I had an old teletype machine that I hooked up to the computer in such a way that it would print.
Blame this on the demise of the teletype machine and typewriters whose deafening clatter molded a tougher breed of hack, one able to talk and write at the same time.