teletypewriter


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teletypewriter:

see typewritertypewriter,
instrument for producing by manual operation characters similar to those of printing. Corresponding to each key on the instrument's keyboard is a steel type.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Teletypewriter

 

a transceiving start-stop printing device with a keyboard similar to that of a typewriter. Teletypewriters are used for long-distance transmission of messages over communications channels in the form of telegrams and coded messages. They are also used as input-output devices, or terminals, for electronic computers and automated data processing systems. In the receiving mode, the messages are automatically printed on the roll of paper in the receiver.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

teletypewriter

[¦tel·ə′tīp‚rīd·ər]
(communications)
A special electric typewriter that produces coded electric signals corresponding to manually typed characters, and automatically types messages when fed with similarly coded signals produced by another machine. Also known as TWX machine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

teletypewriter

(hardware)
(Nearly always abbreviated to "teletype" or "tty") An obsolete kind of terminal, with a noisy mechanical printer for output, a very limited character set, and poor print quality.

See also bit-paired keyboard.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

teletypewriter

A low-speed teleprinter, often abbreviated "TTY."
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References in periodicals archive ?
Included in the signal architecture were tactical teletypewriters, which could transmit and receive at 60 words per minute using 5-bit Baudot code.
The Signal Corps developed new enciphering and deciphering machines which were synchronized with the teletypewriters at both ends of the circuits.
The IRS found that payments for these two services were not subject to the tax, because they were not for local telephone service, toll telephone service or teletypewriter exchange service.
Specifically, this study explores the magnitude and direction (positive or negative) of the relations between job satisfaction and age, gender, hearing status, unemployment history, socioeconomic quality of the job (SEI), total 1993 income, on-the-job work limitations, total number of jobs held, and availability of a teletypewriter telephone device (TTD).
The upgrade entailed the modification of 10 USAF/NATO "Standard" E-3As (which boasted a full maritime surveillance capability, the CC-2 computer, more HF radios, jam-resistant voice communication, a radio teletypewriter and self-defense/ECM provision).
Operating six times faster than the previous system, the new teleprinters communicate at a rate of 30 characters per second or 300 baud in comparison to teletypewriter speeds of five characters per second or 50 baud.
The military career of retired CSM McKinley Curtis III started in 1974 when he enlisted in the Army as a radio teletypewriter operator.
Instead of hanging up a handset, Shiran types "SK" to indicate she is signing off her teletypewriter (TTY).
For most of the Lakeview's existence, guest calling had been done in the traditional way: a remote telephone operator monitored the call's cost and sent the information back to the hotel by teletypewriter. Bostonia notes that more advanced HOBIC service wasn't even available in West Virginia until late 1982.
The Company grew with the nation, and, as technology advanced--from the Morse key and sounder to the teletypewriter to multiplex telegraphy, microwave transmission, and message-switching computer--it adapted to new technology and kept pace with the nation's needs for expanded and enhanced message services.