television monitor


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television monitor

[′tel·ə‚vizh·ən ‚man·əd·ər]
(electronics)
A television set connected to the transmitter at a television station, used to continuously check the image picked up by a television camera and the sound picked up by the microphones.
A closed-circuit television system used to provide continuous observation of such things as hazardous or remote locations, the readings of gages for process control, or microscopic or telescopic images, for greater convenience of viewing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors created PowerPoint illustrations to stream information on flat-panel television monitors. Messages are simplified based on reading skills of populations at the assigned locations.
"The television monitor, the projected image, or the DVD machine is no more important, exciting, or fresh than a pair of glasses.
Ilaiva Sophia, a librarian at the Eugene Public Library, demonstrates how an electronic magnification machine can display documents at a larger size on a television monitor.
Police in Surrey, southern England, have become the first in the world to beam live video images to vehicles fitted with microwave receivers linked to a small television monitor.
A small 10-millimeter telescope is inserted into the abdominal cavity, and the image is projected on a television monitor.
Instead, they sense the heat radiated by the subject and produce its image on a standard television monitor. They can reveal clandestine operations without alerting subjects that they are being observed.
These data feed into a computer program containing three-dimensional MRI or computed tomography (CT) images of the patient taken before surgery, When displayed on a television monitor above the operating table, Smith says, "They show the surgeon where he is while he's operating."
Four artists -- David Hockney, Larry Rivers, Howard Hodgking and Jennifer Bartlett -- are able to choose colors and select brush sizes to draw, color and form images on a television monitor. As they do so, viewers see them through the process of creating original works directly on the screen.
To use TIME, students, through their professor, ask questions of an electronic simulation of a "patient" that appears on a television monitor. The "patient" looks back at the students and responds to their questions by having the computer select an appropriate video track to answer the question.
An image from the camera is then projected onto a television monitor."
"It was soft but I can see why the ref gave it," said McLeish, who had a quick look at a television monitor replay at the time.
A television monitor in his tiny office allows him to keep a watchful eye on the stage at all times.

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