Tell

(redirected from tellable)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

tell

a large mound resulting from the accumulation of rubbish on a long-settled site, esp one with mudbrick buildings, particularly in the Middle East

Tell

William, German name Wilhelm Tell. a legendary Swiss patriot, who, traditionally, lived in the early 14th century and was compelled by an Austrian governor to shoot an apple from his son's head with one shot of his crossbow. He did so without mishap

Tell

 

a type of archaeological remain in Middle Asia, the Caucasus, and the Near East. A tell is a hill or mound composed of remains of ancient structures and filled with their cultural strata.

References in periodicals archive ?
In her study on Possible Worlds, Artificial Intelligence, and Narrative Theory (1991), Ryan specifies these inherently tellable elements mainly in terms of the configuration of story components such as facts and events.
Therefore, I constantly asked myself the following questions: "Why this narrative--or any narrative--is felt to be tellable."/"Why the events of the narrative are reportable" (Labov, 1972, p.
Since the epic, like the novel later, is characterized by its polyphonic structure, it is instructive to examine whose perception, interpretation, and evaluation are considered tellable, and what different value-positions can be constructed.
It seems to be a rule in such stories that sexual secrets are tellable only when they still count in some way as secrets.
we are each of us locations where the stories of our place and time become partially tellable." In Mazali's careful garnering of "women's goings and stayings," women's tellings are central to taking note of the world, of making sense of it in their terms, on their ground, and offering it to other women for their use.
He obfuscates the radical potential of what he hears and sees, encrypting and secreting his father's story within an altogether more tellable fiction about his grandfather.
The resolution involves a monstrous transformation of the male self into a form which is tellable yet not visible.
It is interesting that the process shifts from the tellable to the untellable: stories of the past can be recounted, but for the individual to revisit his past, there must be a passage through and beyond verbalization.
Because the range of tellable stories is unlimited, readers who dip their net often enough into the ocean of narrative are almost certain to encounter the particular story they need to hear, whether the story confirms the essential goodness of human beings or opens the reader's eyes to injustice, selfishness, and vice.
Such skill includes varying our vocabulary and voice to accommodate the capacities of our audience and to match the phases (beginning, middle, and end) of transforming a given event into a tellable tale.
In the first place, the protagonist cannot assemble all the scattered traumata of his life into a legible structure and must deliver them into the hands of one who has the patience and time to construct a tellable tale.
Researchers have reported valid and tellable results in performance ratings of patrol officers (Bradley & Pursley, 1987), small military units (Shapira & Shirom, 1980), geriatric patients (Taylor, Haefele, Thompson, & O'Donoghue, 1970), nurses (Zedeck, Imparato, Krausz, & Oleno, 1974), and school children (Lambert & Hartsough, 1980).