temper


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temper

the degree of hardness, elasticity, or a similar property of a metal or metal object

temper

[′tem·pər]
(engineering)
To moisten and mix clay, plaster, or mortar to the proper consistency for use.
(metallurgy)
The hardness and strength of a rolled metal.
The nominal carbon content of steel.
To soften hardened steel or cast iron by reheating to some temperature below the eutectoid temperature.
An alloy added to pure tin to make the finest pewter.

temper

1. To mix lime, sand, and water in such proportions as to make mortar for masonry or plastering.
2. To moisten and mix clay to proper consistency to form bricks, etc., prior to hardening by fire.
3. To bring to a proper degree of hardness and elasticity for use, as steel or other metal, by heat treatment.
4. To impregnate wood fibers or composition board with a drying oil or other oxidizing resin and subsequently to cure with heat so as to improve the strength, hardness, water resistance, and durability of the board.
References in classic literature ?
How unfortunate that Anne should have displayed such temper before Mrs.
I'm sure I don't know why you should lose your temper like that just because Mrs.
I suppose you think I have an awful temper, but I couldn't help it.
It was a dreadful thing for you to lose your temper like that, Anne."
You were rude and saucy and"--Marilla had a saving inspiration of punishment--"you must go to her and tell her you are very sorry for your bad temper and ask her to forgive you."
Rushworth's elopement, her temper had been in a state of such irritation as to make her everywhere tormenting.
Her temper was naturally the easiest of the two; her feelings, though quick, were more controllable, and education had not given her so very hurtful a degree of self-consequence.
All that followed was the result of her imprudence; and he went off with her at last, because he could not help it, regretting Fanny even at the moment, but regretting her infinitely more when all the bustle of the intrigue was over, and a very few months had taught him, by the force of contrast, to place a yet higher value on the sweetness of her temper, the purity of her mind, and the excellence of her principles.
Grant, with a temper to love and be loved, must have gone with some regret from the scenes and people she had been used to; but the same happiness of disposition must in any place, and any society, secure her a great deal to enjoy, and she had again a home to offer Mary; and Mary had had enough of her own friends, enough of vanity, ambition, love, and disappointment in the course of the last half-year, to be in need of the true kindness of her sister's heart, and the rational tranquillity of her ways.
Having once set out, and felt that he had done so on this road to happiness, there was nothing on the side of prudence to stop him or make his progress slow; no doubts of her deserving, no fears of opposition of taste, no need of drawing new hopes of happiness from dissimilarity of temper. Her mind, disposition, opinions, and habits wanted no half-concealment, no self-deception on the present, no reliance on future improvement.
Susan became the stationary niece, delighted to be so; and equally well adapted for it by a readiness of mind, and an inclination for usefulness, as Fanny had been by sweetness of temper, and strong feelings of gratitude.
He feared that principle, active principle, had been wanting; that they had never been properly taught to govern their inclinations and tempers by that sense of duty which can alone suffice.