temperature coefficient


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temperature coefficient

[′tem·prə·chər ‚kō·i‚fish·ənt]
(physics)
The rate of change of some physical quantity (such as resistance of a conductor or voltage drop across a vacuum tube) with respect to temperature.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For each tested insecticide, the ratio of higher LC50 to the lower LC50 was calculated as temperature coefficient. The temperature coefficient was considered as positive when the LC50 value lower at high temperature and negative when LC50 value is higher at low temperature (Musser and Shelton, 2005; Khan and Akram, 2014).
The behavior of the open-circuit voltage temperature coefficient and the short circuit current temperature coefficient function of the irradiance is reverse.
Secondly, both wafers showed the same temperature coefficient of breakdown voltage where [alpha][V.sub.br] from the slope in Figure 5 was equal to 0.017 V/[degrees]C.
Figure 5 shows the relation between temperature coefficient of variation, energy efficiency, and feeding mode as height of the cavity changes.
The temperature coefficient, or relative response change per degree, is used to adjust a dosimeter's response to the irradiation temperature employed for the system calibration.
Temperature coefficient = 2.303/[DELTA]T log [i.sub.2]/[i.sub.1]
In this article not mean values of temperature coefficient of thermoanthracite SER within 15-700 [degrees]C range are presented, but its differential value determined within each 50-degree interval of thermoanthracite heating within the same temperature range.
It has low g-sensitivity coupled with low temperature coefficient. It is useful in applications where small size, fast warm-up and low power consumption are required such as satellite tracking and guidance systems, radio navigation, radar warning receivers and many other systems requiring precision local reference oscillators.
Another novel effect being developed, Bolvari says, is plastics with a "positive temperature coefficient." They would contain an electrically conductive additive that turns the plastic component into a resistance heater.
The standard temperature coefficient is 3770 ppm/K.
Designed to measure surface temperatures in areas where the sensor itself may be subjected to vibration and high temperature conditions up to 820[degrees]C (650[degrees]C continuous), the High Temperature Model 22493 rigid RTD sensor features ice point resistance of 100 [+ or -] 0.2 [ohms] @ 0[degree)C, a temperature coefficient of 0.003923 [ohm]/[ohm]/[degree]C and <0.05[degrees]C drift/year stability.

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