temper

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temper

the degree of hardness, elasticity, or a similar property of a metal or metal object

temper

[′tem·pər]
(engineering)
To moisten and mix clay, plaster, or mortar to the proper consistency for use.
(metallurgy)
The hardness and strength of a rolled metal.
The nominal carbon content of steel.
To soften hardened steel or cast iron by reheating to some temperature below the eutectoid temperature.
An alloy added to pure tin to make the finest pewter.

temper

1. To mix lime, sand, and water in such proportions as to make mortar for masonry or plastering.
2. To moisten and mix clay to proper consistency to form bricks, etc., prior to hardening by fire.
3. To bring to a proper degree of hardness and elasticity for use, as steel or other metal, by heat treatment.
4. To impregnate wood fibers or composition board with a drying oil or other oxidizing resin and subsequently to cure with heat so as to improve the strength, hardness, water resistance, and durability of the board.
References in classic literature ?
With quickness in understanding the tempers of those she had to deal with, and no natural timidity to restrain any consequent wishes, she was soon welcome and useful to all; and after Fanny's removal succeeded so naturally to her influence over the hourly comfort of her aunt, as gradually to become, perhaps, the most beloved of the two.
Wretchedly did he feel, that with all the cost and care of an anxious and expensive education, he had brought up his daughters without their understanding their first duties, or his being acquainted with their character and temper.
His mistress is feeling the penalty of having been fool enough to vent her ill temper on her head-waiter.
I'm sure I don't know why you should lose your temper like that just because Mrs.
I suppose you think I have an awful temper, but I couldn't help it.
Tyrrel was wrong to let her temper get the better of her, and to suppose herself insulted where no insult was intended.
Bingley was endeared to Darcy by the easiness, openness, and ductility of his temper, though no disposition could offer a greater contrast to his own, and though with his own he never appeared dissatisfied.
Excepting yourself and your brother, I do not know his equal for temper.
I dare say you're wondering why I don't put my arm round your waist,' the Duchess said after a pause: `the reason is, that I'm doubtful about the temper of your flamingo.
Did not my father, my grandfathers, too, before me, lose their temper at times, in Heaven's name?
The king your father and the king your grandfather never lost their temper except when under the protection of their own palace.
A foolish wrangle followed; and Herncastle's unlucky temper got the better of him.