temporal bone


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temporal bone

either of two compound bones forming part of the sides and base of the skull: they surround the organs of hearing
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

temporal bone

[′tem·prəl ‚bōn]
(anatomy)
The bone forming a portion of the lateral aspect of the skull and part of the base of the cranium in vertebrates.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Surgical management of a pneumatized articular eminence of the temporal bone. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1982; 40:311-313.
Of a total of 55 patients with temporal bone osteomyelitis, 15 patients had previous ear operation (2 ventilation tube insertions, 1 C[O.sub.2] laser operation, 1 type I tympanoplasty, and 11 tympanomastoidectomies).
Temporal bone CT can detect deviations in the course and caliber of the intratemporal facial nerve, which can provide key information regarding facial nerve pathology and prove critical in surgical planning for otologic surgery.
Extracanalicular osteomas of the temporal bone. Arch Otolaryngol 1979; 105: 706-9.
The size and macroscopic structure of the models were comparable to a real temporal bone. The "feel" of drilling was fairly close to real bone in most of the studied models.
Many investigators have studied the IAM on radiographs, on casts, in dissected temporal bones, and in histologic sections (Amjad et al., 1969; Schuknecht & Gulja, 1986; Silverstein et al., 1988; Fujita & Sando, 1994; Bosbuga et al., 1998; Lescanne et al., 2002), and have found that the dimensions, shape, and volume of the normal adult IAM vary widely, even between to sides of the same individual, as well as among different individuals.
The transducer output in the temporal bone and the mechanical middle ear model showed a plateau around 0.1 im for frequencies below 800 Hz.
Any member of these audiences will benefit from reading Imaging of the Temporal Bone.
CT without injection typically shows an opacity of the tympanomastoid cavity associated with an hyperostosis of the temporal bone and a hairy aspect of the margins of the involved bone [11].
A lack of familiarity with the temporal bone anatomy appears to have contributed to the facial nerve injury in majority of these patients.
Although very rarely encountered, myxomas can be seen in different parts of the temporal bone and other parts of the head and neck region (1-8).

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