temporal decomposition

temporal decomposition

[′tem·prəl ‚dē‚käm·pə′zish·ən]
(control systems)
The partitioning of the control or decision-making problem associated with a large-scale control system into subproblems based on the different time scales relevant to the associated action functions.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second category, the algorithm is modified to take advantage of the multi-GPU computer platform by channel decomposition, temporal decomposition, and tuning of the two techniques to yield best performance for a given imaging scenario.
The implementation of such a pipeline follows the actor model [26] where each pipeline stage is one (or multiple, see temporal decomposition in Section 3.3) actor, receiving input data from the previous stage as message and passing results to the following stage as a different message.
Channel decomposition and temporal decomposition can be applied for different imaging situations in different ways.
Reference [15] investigated the influence of removing inter-view prediction from the higher temporal decomposition levels, but failed to implement their algorithm properly.
In [13] authors combine spatial and temporal decomposition of video into multiple descriptions.
Chen and Pinto [24] use Lagrangean-based decomposition techniques for solving the temporal decomposition of a continuous flexible process network; they use subgradient methods to solve the decomposed problem.
The hierarchical models used in this research will differ from those described in prior research in two significant areas: (1) the temporal decomposition and (2) the feedback-and-control mechanisms governing interrelationships between levels.
The temporal decomposition used in this research differs from that used in most prior research in three respects.
The second distinction from prior temporal decompositions is related to the first but goes beyond merely recognizing the different time scales (17).
This study provides the estimates of the temporal decomposition of the gender pay gap using both the mean and the quantile regression approach [Pham and Barry (2006)], which provides quantile measures of the gender wage at two specific points in time, 1997 and 2006, using respective Labour Force Surveys for each of these years.
In the context of the quantile regression approach, we largely relied on the temporal decomposition technique of Pham and Barry (2006).
Further temporal decompositions of exposure can be made; for example, one could consider variation in daily averages within a month, monthly averages within a year, yearly averages within a decade, and so on (Dominici et al.
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