session key

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session key

A temporary key used to encrypt data for only the current session. The use of session keys keeps the secret keys even more secret because they are not used directly to encrypt the data. The secret keys are used to derive the session keys using various methods that combine random numbers from either the client or server or both. See key management and security protocol.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bauckhage, "Temporal key poses for human action recognition," in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision Workshops (ICCV '11), pp.
Both attacks work only on WPA systems that use the Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP) algorithm.
Features include IEEE 802.11i compliant radio with AES-CCMP (Advanced Encryption Standard-Counter Mode with Cipher Block Chaining Message Authentication Code Protocol) and TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol); a complete suite of 802.
In a mixed environment, access points will typically use a lowest-common-denominator cipher as the group cipher, such as wired equivalent privacy or temporal key integrity protocol, to allow both 802.11i and pre-802.11i stations to decrypt multicast traffic.
The Hifn 7956 security processor is ideal for wireless applications with the acceleration of the Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP) and AES Counter Mode encryption with CBC-MAC Protocol (CCMP), and its high-speed LZS(R) compression engines to increase packet throughput.
Also featured in the latest release is WPA, is an industry standard that uses the Temporal Key Integrity Protocol technology.
In contrast, WPA uses Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP), generating a new key for every 10KB of data transmitted over the network.
WPA utilizes improved encryption via the Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP) along with 802.1X as the framework for user authentication and encryption key distribution to provide enterprise grade security for Wi-Fi users.
Indeed, (i) the second and third tuple belong to two contiguous ticks, (ii) they have the same temporal key (Course#) value, and (iii) whereas the Office value remains the same, the TA value changes.
The IEEE 802.11i task group introduced the Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP) with WPA as a stop gap for existing WEP networks.
Security features include IEEE 802.1 li-compliant radio with AES-CCMP (Advanced Encryption Standard-Counter Mode with Cipher Block Chaining Message Authentication Code Protocol) and TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol); a complete suite of 802.1x EAP (Extensible Authentication Protocols), including EAP-TLS (Transport Layer Security), EAP-TTLS (Tunneled Transport Layer Security), PEAP (Open standard from Cisco Systems, Microsoft and RSA Security), LEAP (Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol); end-to-end TLS/SSL 3.0 (Secure Sockets Layer) and SSH (Secure Shell) tunneling; and end-to-end AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) 128-bit encrypted tunneling.
While WPA-PSK still uses the RC4 encryption standard used in WEP, it implements temporal key integrity protocol (TKIP), which provides per-packet key mixing, a message integrity check and a re-keying mechanism.