tenement

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tenement

1. (now esp in Scotland) a large building divided into separate flats
2. Property law any form of permanent property, such as land, dwellings, offices, etc.

Tenement

A building with multiple dwelling units accessed by a single stairway, with two or more apartments on each floor.

tenement

A building having multiple housing units for rent; often, ill-maintained, overcrowded units that may barely meet minimum code requirements for safety and sanitation; usually built many years earlier and found in poorer sections of a city.
References in periodicals archive ?
By examining Osorio's novel alongside of these plans and the discourses and legal practices that supported them, this article analyzes how the literary portrayal of life in a tenement house, also called tiendas de habitacion or casas de vecindad, represents the ways in which the lumpenproletariat claimed their place in the city.
Osorio's tenement house upsets the civilized ways of life that the elites and bourgeoisie aspired to crystallize in the administrative center of the city.
(53.) William John Freyer, The tenement house law of the city of New York, with headings, paragraphs, marginal notes and full indexes, (New York: The Record and guide, 1901), 38, Section 100 and p.
Further, the rigid lot-size restriction discouraged experimentation with alternative architectures that might have led over time to a market-based improvement of the standard Manhattan tenement house. For example, one 19th-century architect showed that a block built around shallower lots (say, 25-by-50 feet) would have encouraged Philadelphia-style rows of townhomes similar to modern townhomes--more square-shaped structures allowing light and air to enter from both front and rear, so that every room in the house would receive significant relief from the problems plaguing Manhattan's tenements.
(14) It is difficult to tell just how much relief of New York's tenement house problem would have been brought about by free (or even semifree) construction of tall residential buildings in 19th-century Manhattan.
[78] As housing reformer Lawrence Veiller observed thirteen years after the passage of New York's 1901 Tenement House Law, "The theory ...
Devine, "Municipal Reform and Social Welfare in New York: A Study of the Low Administration in Its Relation to the Protection of the Tenement House Population," American Monthly Review of Reviews (October 1903): 438; Joy J.
Congested living conditions were further exacerbated by the development of the tenement house. Conditions here were ideal for the spread of infectious disease and slum dwellers were ravaged by epidemics of typhus, scarlet fever, smallpox, and typhoid.
The building site comprises two 8-storey tenement houses and are vacant for the construction work.
"The area's overlooked by tenement houses so the incident was witnessed by residents.
Growing up in Greenock, near Glasgow, I'd take the train through the valley and notice the big grand houses up on the hill which belonged to the shipyard owners and then look down on the shipyard and the blocks of tenement houses clustered around it for the workers.
This genre comes alive together with the bourgeois lifestyle, the problems of a tenement house space, the urban experience and its influence on the subject.