teraphim


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teraphim

(tĕr`əfĭm), in the Bible, a plural term of uncertain origin referring either to household idols or to idols set up in a local sanctuary, or consulted for purposes of divination. Little is known regarding their form, except that they could be of a person's size, or small enough to be carried by hand.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Or he might evoke the figure of Rossetti looking up dictionaries for his stunning words: his 'geomaunt' and 'teraphim,' his 'euphrasies' and 'voluntaries.' No figure comparable to these consecrated Sydney's Public Library with memories of his frequent or even occasional presence.
Nor do Rachel or Samson's wife lie when stealing Laban's teraphim (Gen 31:19) and extricating the answer to the riddle (Judg 14:15-17), respectively.
We meet Rachel, Jacob's wife, who has reclaimed her grandmother's teraphim and must bear the penalty of death if discovered.
Rachel lied to her own father, Laban, when he came seeking his household idols (teraphim) which she had stolen (Gen.
We learn that she herself is not God-fearing, as she uses teraphim (small idols) to make a dummy in David's bed, which fools her father's henchmen and saves David's life (I Sam.
(6.) Genesis 31:35 recalls (ridicules?) the importance of teraphim to Laban (and possibly to Rachel).
Gressmann, "Teraphim: Masken und Winkorakel in Agypten und Vorderasien," ZAW 40 (1922): 75-137; A.
With Laban, we note that Rachel stole the teraphim that were her father's (Gen.
Karel van der Toorn ("The Nature of the Biblical teraphim in the Light of the Cuneiform Evidence," CBQ 52 [1990]: 221) interprets the form in Emar 185 as lu u-na-ab-bi (as above), and translates, "he is surely to invoke." (17) This restoration is based on ME 121:5-6.