terbium


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terbium

(tûr`bēəm) [from Ytterby, a village in Sweden], metallic chemical element; symbol Tb; at. no. 65; at. wt. 158.92535; m.p. 1,356°C;; b.p. 3,123°C;; sp. gr. about 8.25; valence +3 or +4. Terbium is a soft, malleable, ductile, silver-gray metal. It is one of the rare-earth metalsrare-earth metals,
in chemistry, group of metals including those of the lanthanide series and actinide series and usually yttrium, sometimes scandium and thorium, and rarely zirconium. Promethium, which is not found in nature, is not usually considered a rare-earth metal.
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 of the lanthanide serieslanthanide series,
a series of metallic elements, included in the rare-earth metals, in Group 3 of the periodic table. Members of the series are often called lanthanides, although lanthanum (atomic number 57) is not always considered a member of the series.
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 in Group 3 of the periodic tableperiodic table,
chart of the elements arranged according to the periodic law discovered by Dmitri I. Mendeleev and revised by Henry G. J. Moseley. In the periodic table the elements are arranged in columns and rows according to increasing atomic number (see the table entitled
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. It does not tarnish rapidly in air. Its oxide, terbia, Tb2O3, is white; its peroxide, Tb4O7, is dark brown to black. Most of the salts are colorless or white and all contain trivalent terbium. The element and its compounds have limited commercial importance; some minor uses are in lasers, semiconductor devices, and phosphors for color television picture tubes. Terbium is found in gadolinite, cerite, and other rare-earth minerals and is recovered from euxenite, monazite, and zenotime. It is difficult to separate it from the other rare-earth metals; several methods are used. The pure metal may be produced by chemical reduction of the halide with calcium. The element was discovered in 1843 by C. G. Mosander as its oxide, which he called erbia. The element has been known as terbium since 1877.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Terbium

 

Tb, the chemical element with atomic number 65 and atomic weight 158.9254; a rare-earth metal and a lanthanide.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

terbium

[′tər·bē·əm]
(chemistry)
A rare-earth element, symbol Tb, in the yttrium subgroup of the transition elements, atomic number 65, atomic weight 158.9254.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

terbium

a soft malleable silvery-grey element of the lanthanide series of metals, occurring in gadolinite and monazite and used in lasers and for doping solid-state devices. Symbol: Tb; atomic no.: 65; atomic wt.: 158.92534; valency: 3 or 4; relative density: 8.230; melting pt.: 1356°C; boiling pt.: 3230°C
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The usual approach for analytical methods based on terbium luminescence consists in the use of terbium-sensitized luminescence (TSL).
Due to the lack of such description in the current state of the art, novel theoretical explanation of the relationship of photoluminescence effect and photocatalytic activity and the surface properties of Ti[O.sub.2] doped with terbium has been presented.
(47) Deposits in Canada, owned by Great Western Minerals Group (GWMC), show promise of having dysprosium and terbium (needed for increased magnet coercivity).
earth elements (HREEs), such as, dysprosium, terbium, neodymium,
Scientists discovered that the addition of other REEs (terbium or dysprosium) to the NdFeB alloy helped to increase its coercivity.
Yttrium, ytterbium, erbium and terbium are all named for Ytterby; many other rare earths have Scandinavian names, such as holmium, named for Stockholm, and scandium, named for Scandinavia.
The rare earth sector covers companies with operations involving exploration, extraction, transport, processing or any other business involving any of the following 17 rare earth elements: Scandium, Yttrium, Lanthanum, Lutetium, Ytterbium, Thulium, Erbium, Holmium, Dysprosium, Terbium, Gadolinium, Europium, Samarium, Promethium, Neodymium, Praseodymium, and Cerium.
"People look upon rare earths as one entity, but the demand may be great for terbium, for example, and not all that great for some others," he said.
Reported assays for Heavy REE's include Terbium (Tb) with grades up to 20.3 ppm (g/t) and Ytterbium (Yb) with grades up to 31.3 ppm (g/t) while reported light rare earth metals include Cerium (Ce) with grades up to 459 ppm (g/t) and Lanthanum (La) with grades up to 1,300 ppm (g/t).
Uses of Specific Rare Earth Elements Magnets Magnets for Batteries for Wind for Element Vehicles Turbines Vehicles Lighting Yttrium X Dysprosium X X Terbium X Europium X Samarium X X Nepdymium X X X Praesodymium X X X Cerium X X Lanthanum X X Source: U.S.
Resin Batch Composition Esthet X 0708000242 UDMA, Bis-GMA, Bis-EMA, TEGDMA 60 vol% of fluor-aluminum boron barium silicate glass with particles sized 0.6-0.8 [micro]m and silica nanoparticles (0.04 nm) 4 Seasons K27335 Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA 76 wt% of barium glass filler, trifluor terbium, Ba-Al fluor silicate glass and dispersed silica with filler particles sized 0.04-3.0 [micro]m, and filler average size of 0.6 [micro]m Table 2--Mouthwashes, pH, compositions and batches.
[15.] Burnham D., Eyring L., Kordis J.: "High-temperature X-ray diffraction studies of the terbium oxide-oxygen and mixed cerium terbium oxide-oxygen systems".