Terpsichore


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Terpsichore

(tərpsĭk`ərē): see MusesMuses,
in Greek religion and mythology, patron goddesses of the arts, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne. Originally only three, they were later considered as nine. Calliope was the Muse of epic poetry and eloquence; Euterpe, of music or of lyric poetry; Erato, of the poetry of
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.

Terpsichore

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Terpsichore, asteroid 81 (the 81st asteroid to be discovered, on September 30, 1864), is approximately 122 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 4.8 years. Terpsichore was named after the Greek muse of dance and choral song. According to Martha Lang-Wescott, Terpsichore represents flexibility, agility, dance, body language and gestures, and movement. Jacob Schwartz adds “disciplined physical exercise.” This asteroid’s key words are “movement” and “body ego.”

Sources:

Lang-Wescott, Martha. Asteroids-Mechanics: Ephemerides II. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1990.
Lang-Wescott, Martha. Mechanics of the Future: Asteroids. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1991.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Terpsichore

muse of dancing. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 849]
See: Dance

Terpsichore

Muse of choral song and dancing. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 260]

Terpsichore

the Muse of the dance and of choral song
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References in periodicals archive ?
Children from three to six -- roughly -- will learn about Terpsichore, a little girl who dreams about becoming a ballet dancer.
They will be performing Terpsichore Glory, the 31st annual show of the Christine Anderson Theatre Group, the result of 16 months of practice and rehearsals.
Her Terpsichore in Balanchine's Apollo was an almost bel canto display, musically huge but tonally sensitive, full of rises and waves and rippling finishes ("Balanchine would have loved her" said the writer Holly Brubach after Part's brilliant Saturday matinee).
Ditters made a name for himself with his 12 programmatic sinfonias based on Ovids Metamorphoses and in Pichl's output we also find a cycle of sinfonias with the names of Greek muses: Terpsichore, Euterpe, Uranie, Clio, Melpomene, Calliope, Thalia and Polyhymnia (cca 1764-1769).
She seemed to be steadily climbing the professional ladder, but in the heel of it Terpsichore failed her.
The photo sequence is followed by a musical score for terpsichore.
Los Angeles County Museum of Art presents ``Late Night at LACMA,'' featuring a special after-hours costume ball that celebrates the opening of the special exhibition, ``Renoir to Matisse: The Eye of Duncan Phillips,'' as well as ``Spooky Sci-Fi,'' a live audiovisual extravaganza presented by the Terpsichore Group, 8 to 11 p.
The etymology is from the Latin form of the Greek Terpsichore, muse of dancing and dramatic chorus.
The Italian dancer and choreographer Carlo Blasis instructs his students in his manual The Code of Terpsichore (1830) to move their bodies with less impulse, more modification, and less grandeur and elevation than stage dancers, suggesting that it is the performance of the ideal by the lower ranks of professional dancers that operates as the modified ideal for aristocratic modeling.
The street names are also an adventure in pronunciation - even if you're familiar with how to say Calliope, Terpsichore and Polyminia in Greek, prepare to be baffled as the stressed syllables are randomly mixed up.
Two big, ecstatic classics, Lunapark and Toccata (both 2001), were on view along with some interesting recent developments like Terpsichore (2000-2001), whose surface pattern of animal skulls and lace doilies in flesh and butter tones suggested "some Warholian society-portrait-cum-vanitas," as my-husband-the-writer Brooks Adams not so succinctly put it.
For classes in your area, contact the British Dance Council, Terpsichore House, 240 Merton Road, London SW19 1EQ, enclosing an SAE.