terrestrial sediment

terrestrial sediment

[tə′res·trē·əl ′sed·ə·mənt]
(geology)
A sedimentary deposit on land above tidal reach.
References in periodicals archive ?
where [delta][sup.13][C.sub.sample] is the sample stable carbon isotope ratio; [delta][sup.13][C.sub.terrestrial] is the typical stable carbon isotope ratio of terrestrial sediment ([approximately equal to] 27[per thousand]), and [delta][sup.13][C.sub.marine] is the typical stable carbon isotope ratio of marine sediment ([approximately equal to] 20[per thousand]) (Fry, 2006).
It was a time when research suggests that the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere was roughly comparable to today's-leading to the conclusion that relatively small fluctuations in carbon dioxide levels can have a major influence on Arctic climate, according to a new analysis of the longest terrestrial sediment core ever collected in the Arctic.
Previous studies about sediment were mainly concentrated on the river sediment, marine sediment, and terrestrial sediment. However, these studies focused on sediment on the surface generally [1].
Terrestrial sediment loading could possibly be an important factor affecting kelp distribution especially in Malibu where watershed connections are numerous.
Both the marine and terrestrial sediment records do not indicate that an impact event was the trigger for the transition into the Younger Dryas cold period.
This paradigm was challenged two years ago by a group of researchers that reported finding high iridium concentrations in terrestrial sediments dated during this time period, which led them to theorise that an impact event was instead the instigator of this climate shift.
Consider the global effect that small and medium-sized dams have had on catchment hydrology, river ecology and the pathways by which terrestrial sediments eventually reach marine sinks.
Herschel Island is composed of a variety of ice-rich marine and terrestrial sediments that are typically deformed.
Sediments exposed on Herschel Island are a complicated mix of shallow-water, marine, and terrestrial sediments that exhibit a high degree of faulting, folding, and other deformation resulting from glacier ice-thrust.
Based on these traditional factors, many authors consider that continental coral reef growth have been affected by human disturbance, primarily terrestrial sediments (Wilkinson 1992, Guzman and Cortes 1993).
These reefs could be considered healthy because they are not directly exposed to the more devastating chronic anthropogenic impacts like terrestrial sediments. Tourism is increasing and the island has been exposed to several warming events associated to El Nino with intense effects (Glynn et al.
Inversion begins with the emersion in the Coniacian and ends with the terrestrial sediments of the Paleocene which represent the beginning of the compressional phase (Puigdefabregas and Souquet, 1986).
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