territorial imperative


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territorial imperative

the tendency of individuals or groups of individuals to protect their own territories (Ardrey, 1967). While the ‘territorial behaviour’ of some birds and animals is well established (see ETHOLOGY), the notion that some human behaviour is closely analogous, i.e. instinctive, is treated with much scepticism in sociology, along with other such suggestions made by SOCIOBIOLOGY.
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ONE KEY ADVOCATE of this view was the science writer Robert Ardrey, who published The Territorial Imperative in 1966.
The "territorial imperative" meant capturing a place and fending off rivals with a rock to the head or, as in 2001, a dead tapir's bone.
When marking and defending boundaries were crucial for canine survival, they likely had a key role, adding a dog's unique and identifying scent to his excrement; today, salutatory butt-sniffing might very well be an evolutionary remnant of that territorial imperative. Another theory is that the liquid in the anal sacs lubricates hard stool, making it easier for the dog to eliminate.
Kingdoms warred with others to whet the territorial imperative, and monarchs were guillotined by the nobles to end their divine rights.
* the territorial imperative, whereby the individual struggles to claim and/ or defend his or her particular space (usually interior) and thus assert and/ or protect his or her identity;
But globalization has a built-in braking system: it leads to 'the resurgence of another of humanity's ancient predispositions: the territorial imperative'.
Cooper puts it that Europe should consist more or less entirely of states which are no longer governed by the territorial imperative. NATO and the EU have played an important role in reinforcing the fact that Western Europe countries no longer want to fight each other.
Bush years through a theoretical perspective that synthesizes John Kenneth Galbraith's discourse on power and Robert Ardrey's notion of the territorial imperative, broadly understood to include the drive to gain access to and maintain property rights.
One reader suggested a link to the California migration north, specifically to the "territorial imperative (rats in the cage) syndrome that makes people in overcrowded environments like L.A.
These individuals are set in direct contrast to the "absurdly over-determined characterisation" (Jacobs 1987:33) of, for example, the Kloppers, who represent "the territorial imperative gone berserk" (Newman 1990:62).
Discussing Hamlet, for example, Bogdanov examines the play's obsession with "[p]ower, and the nature of power, the use and abuse of it, usurpation, [and] the territorial imperative" (18).
But even so, her critique of the 'territorial imperative' in long-standing icons of landscape art irritates me.

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