tertiary recovery

tertiary recovery

[′tər·shē‚er·ē ri′kəv·ə·rē]
(petroleum engineering)
A technique used to enhance the amount of oil recovered by secondary recovery methods.
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In the annual performance submission to the Alberta Energy Regulator by CNRL, they said that primary recovery on their leases has been between 5% to 8%, while incremental polymer flooding has increased tertiary recovery to a range from 14% to 30%.
And if PDO is scaling back on tertiary recovery projects, then it's a fairly safe bet that smaller producers will do so too.
USPRwire, Wed Sep 09 2015] Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is also known as tertiary recovery.
Schlumberger will utilize in-house experts in primary, secondary and tertiary recovery with the ultimate goal of deciding the best way forward, if appropriate, to recover additional oil reserves contained within these fields.
A lot of the offshore product is exported directly, avoiding pipelines that are the main target for siphoning aACA* also those interested in secondary and tertiary recovery of fields the risks will be limited as well, given that the mature fields that require this type of investments are in the southeast of the country where the cartels have a lower presence," Petersen said.
Enhanced oil recovery is also called improved oil recovery or tertiary recovery (as opposed to primary and secondary recovery).
Secondary and tertiary recovery technologies now boast of a recovery factor of 60 percent to 75 percent, he said while inaugurating "IEF NOC-IOC Forum" in its third edition here yesterday.
Also known as tertiary recovery, EOR allows up to 60% of a reservoir's original oil to be extracted.
Modern tertiary recovery techniques will be required to maximise reservoir drainage as well as formations and treatment in less permeable reservoirs.
By reducing the scope of the project to our own tertiary recovery efforts the blended rate of return on a smaller project could be significantly higher than that of the larger project and, as a result, we believe will be more attractive to closing the necessary financing to proceed.
If and when the growth of oil consumption seriously depletes reserves, the cost of extracting oil (whether from shale, tar sands, or through tertiary recovery from buried crude deposits) will have assuredly risen to such a high level that non-fossil energy sources--nuclear, geothermal, hydro, wind, or biomass will be used in preference to oil and other fossil fuels remaining in the ground.
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