tessellate

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tessellate

[′tes·ə‚lāt]
(botany)
Marked by a pattern of small squares resembling a tiled pavement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Depending on the edges that need more detail, the algorithm selects a pattern for tessellating the input triangle (see Figure 3).
Which of the Blokus 3D pieces can be used to fill space ("filling" a volume of space with no gaps or holes--the three-dimensional equivalent of two-dimensional tessellating covering a surface) using one of the pieces repeatedly; or one pair of pieces, or one triplet of pieces, and so on, repeatedly?
After they explore the figures, students can learn how to create tessellating figures of their own by using any computer-drawing program.
Seven of the nine paintings in the show employ clear variations on a tessellating trihedral pattern appropriated from the Louis Kahn-designed ceiling of the Yale Art Gallery, an exemplar of midcentury architectural innovation.
Is this number the same as the number of tessellating shapes that meet at a vertex of the shape?
All I had to do was fit these tessellating pieces into a 12-sided shape and the money would be mine.
The show was dominated by a room-size floor-based work, Paraparquetry, 2007, consisting of twelve hundred brick-size "furniture fragments" (per the checklist) arranged in the intricate tessellating design of a parquet floor.
Tessellating patterns are found in Islamic culture in repeating designs that decorate mosques and palaces (Zaslavsky 1994) and in Navajo culture in designs that appear on blankets (Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.
And Icosaeder, a smaller wall piece, takes the compositional device a step further: Over a flat disc of tessellating triangles, Lachowicz has built an irregular, domelike lattice of the same sharp shapes.
From this discussion, I made the transition from background knowledge to hands-on lessons and activities that prompted further exploration of tessellating patterns.
In the largest work at the Worcester Art Museum, the almost eighteen-foot-high Jack and Money in the Bank (all works 2004), van der Stokker fills a purple out-line reminiscent of a Carroll Dunham and another that suggests a border or coastline with tessellating patterns of red, green, and yellow squares.
Other activities include making curves with straight lines, creating a set of tangram pieces, tessellating squares into interesting patterns, constructing a Mobius strip, and putting together nets to build some basic geometric solids.