Tessitura

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Tessitura

 

the prevailing position of sounds in a musical work in relation to the compass of a voice or musical instrument. Naturalness, freedom, and beauty of execution of a vocal part require that the part’s tessitura correspond to the nature of the singer’s voice. In an instrumental work, the tessitura must conform to the technical abilities of the given instrument.

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(6) Adding the range of all sections we have the Aria Range; adding the tessitura of all sections we have the General Tessitura of the aria; by the intersection of the tessituras, we have the Optimal Region of this specific aria, what represents the notes belonging to all tessituras.
One way of approaching the problem is to analyze solo music written specifically for such singers, since compositions from a large part of seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were "tailored" and clearly reveal vocal characteristics of certain singers, defining measurements such as tessitura, range, as well as good and bad vocal regions.
Although those pieces already reveal the style of the particular vocal line of each singer, it was determined to go further and characterize more objective "measurements" such as tessitura, range, and good and bad regions of the voices, so that it would be possible to classify their voice types in a less intuitive manner, as it previously had been done by historians.
In the second chapter, Cope examines the harmonic contents of the two bands' early output according to six criteria, ranging from tessitura to riff intervals to texture.
None of the parts in the original manuscript are given vocal designations, and there is a large degree of overlap between clefs (and hence tessituras).
Tessitura is defined as the pitch area in which the majority of the melodic tones of a composition lie.
If created within the boundaries previously discussed for range, tessitura, phrase lengths, etc., atonal music should not be more innately difficult vocally than tonal music.
Transposing a melodic line downward and vocalizing it in a more comfortable tessitura or vocalizing it on a single vowel, followed by the vowels only of the text are suggested aids for efficient and safe learning.
It is longer than most of these period pieces, which would be a concern in a live performance, especially the second movement's high tessitura and long flowing lines.
Just as voice classification depends primarily on ease of tessitura, timbre, and agility, so too can various roles be distinguished as appropriate for particular voice types according to the demands inherent in the score.
What years ago was primarily a question of range has become, in recent decades, myriad questions including such categories as register breaks, timbre, zones of ease of production (tessitura), and the degree of agility.
Since repertoire singers were asked to perform began to include ever more diversity in terms of the demands of orchestration, tessitura, and range, so, too, did the amount of repertoire that was inappropriate for a given singer continue to increase.