test cross


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test cross

[′test ‚krȯs]
(genetics)
A cross between an individual homozygous at one or more loci and a test subject; the phenotype of the progeny will reveal the subject's genotype at these loci.
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The test cross data pertaining to these crosses showed that there was variation for seed color in crosses with both Crystal and Minerva.
The test cross data pertaining to these crosses (Table 5) did not show variation for seed color with Bionda while variation for seed color was observed with Minerva, Crystal, and Bolley Golden.
The test cross data for these crosses indicated that the loci involved in imparting yellow seed color in the European recessive yellow parents and variegated seed color in the variegated parent were d and b1, respectively (Table 5).
Test cross results for all the classes of crosses involving the four USDA-ARS Introductions possessing specific seed color genes to study inheritance of seed color in flax.
The combined nested analysis of variance for test crosses to LH163 provided evidence of epistasis (P [is greater than] 0.01) for the overall population (Table 4).
The method used to detect epistasis was based on triple test crosses (Kearsey and Jinks, 1968) as modified by Ketata et al.
The genotype X environment interaction in the triple test cross data was detected following the analysis suggested by Perkins and Jinks (1971).
Thus, STS213 is useful for early selection of plants for use in wide crosses, eliminating the need to test cross, self and score for fertility, a majority of the plants in a population.
This eliminates the need to make test crosses followed by selfs, and fertility assessments from the remaining 62.5% of the [F.sub.3] individuals in order to transfer [S-5.sup.n] from indica to japonica lines.
Segregation ratios observed in progenies from Embryogenic [F.sub.1] X Embryogenic [F.sub.1], [BC.sub.1] ([F.sub.1] X Jay), and test cross ([F.sub.1] X OSG-13) progenies were best explained using a two-locus independent dominant gene model.
Based on the segregation patterns in all four progeny types ([F.sub.1], [F.sub.2], [BC.sub.1], and test cross), the ability to form somatic embryos from leaf explants in orchardgrass was conditioned by two independent dominant genes that have complementary effects.
In addition, test crosses were also produced between selected Embryogenic [F.sub.1] plants and plants randomly selected from the nonembryogenic population, OSG-13.