capacity

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capacity

1. a measure of the electrical output of a piece of apparatus such as a motor, generator, or accumulator
2. Electronics a former name for capacitance
3. Computing
a. the number of words or characters that can be stored in a particular storage device
b. the range of numbers that can be processed in a register
4. the bit rate that a communication channel or other system can carry
5. legal competence

capacity

[kə′pas·əd·ē]
(analytical chemistry)
In chromatography, a measurement used in ion-exchange systems to express the adsorption ability of the ion-exchange materials.
(computer science)
(electricity)
(science and technology)
Volume, especially in reference to merchandise or containers thereof.

capacity

2. The volume contained in a vessel.
3. The maximum or minimum water flow obtainable under given conditions (e.g., specified conditions of pressure, temperature, and velocity).

capacity

As it pertains to airports, it is the ability of an airport to handle a given volume of traffic. It is a limit that cannot be exceeded without incurring an operational penalty.

capacity

(communications)
The maximum possible data transfer rate of a communications channel under ideal conditions. The total capacity of a channel may be shared between several independent data streams using some kind of multiplexing, in which case, each stream's data rate may be limited to a fixed fraction of the total capacity.

capacity

With regard to computer and information systems, capacity refers to the storage and transaction processing capability of computer systems, the network and/or the datacenter. See capacity on demand and storage capacity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Testamentary capacity precedes an analysis of either undue influence or insane delusions; it considers whether the individual had the capacity to understand the nature and extent of his property, to know the natural objects of his bounty, and to form an intent regarding the disposition of his property at death.
That the testator lacked testamentary capacity at the time of signing the 2000 Codicil and the 2001 Will;
individuals testamentary capacity, today only minors are categorically
Some commentators have criticized the comparison of contractual capacity with that of testamentary capacity because the two are "so different in their nature that it is impossible to use one as a test for measuring the other." (253) Be that as it may, numerous court decisions in multiple jurisdictions state "that testamentary capacity requires a lower degree of mental capacity than contractual or business capacity." (254) As difficult as it may be to compare the capacity standards for wills and contracts, the test for capacity in the making of wills is an issue to be decided by a jury.
(28) If it is necessary that a question of testamentary capacity be answered, that an inventory of the estate be taken, or that legal ambiguities in the status of property be resolved, the period within which the will should be prepared should be longer.
Schoenblum also found " predominant weapon for attempting to undo a will is an allegation of undue influence or lack of testamentary capacity." Id.
The question of whether a testator has testamentary capacity is a legal one.
Manlove concluded that "he could not have defended the will signing under the South Dakota three-part test for testamentary capacity" and that Fred's schizophrenia rendered him "more susceptible to undue influence...." (285)
The last three chapters shift to address forensics, discussing the difference between treatment-oriented and forensic examinations, impairments and disabilities, legal determination of causation and damages, consent and testamentary capacity, and total analysis of records.
The Court is empowered, by statute, to "make" a "will" for an individual lacking testamentary capacity. (2) The notional "will-maker" is, by definition, a person in need of protection.