testimony


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testimony

1. Law evidence given by a witness, esp orally in court under oath or affirmation
2. Old Testament
a. the Ten Commandments, as inscribed on the two stone tables
b. the Ark of the Covenant as the receptacle of these (Exodus 25:16; 16:34)

Testimony

 

in Soviet law, oral evidence concerning circumstances of significance for a criminal or civil case made by a witness during questioning or in court and included in the record. The information given as testimony may result from direct observation of the event, action, or fact or may be drawn from the accounts of other persons or from documents.

In criminal cases, testimony can be used to establish any circumstance subject to proof; in certain civil cases, testimony does not constitute proof, for example, an oral agreement concerning a loan of more than 50 rubles. Giving deliberately false testimony, refusing to answer questions, and giving evasive answers are criminal offenses against the administration of justice (for example, Criminal Code of the RSFSR, arts. 181 and 182).

In labor law, testimony is admitted in establishing the length of service when assigning pensions in those cases where the appropriate documents have not been saved and cannot be obtained because records do not exist. Testimony is authorized to determine the length of service of an industrial worker or office employee only in cases where at least one-half of the period in question can be confirmed by documents; for kolkhoz members, the entire period of service required for assignment of a pension can be established by testimony. The period of service is established on the basis of testimony of two or more witnesses, one of whom must know the claimant from working together at the same enterprise or in the same system. The testimony may be submitted in written form, in which case the authenticity of the signatures of the witnesses must be notarized.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than accept audiovisual testimony as "unvarnished" or "raw," Shenker's work pays careful attention to the impact on testimonial performances of crucial framing conditions, from the training and guidelines given to interviewers, to the sorts of questions each archive favors, to the ways that each archive uses (or envisions eventual uses for) its collection.
You can also filter result by gender, experience group, country that interview took place in, country of birth of the person giving the testimony, and by the length of the video.
Terms of testimony: There should not be any contraindications for testimony in all conditions.
West Virginia law does not require that an expert hold a West Virginia license; thus, physicians who are licensed in other states routinely provide expert testimony in medical malpractice cases.
The same psychologist gave similar testimony in six other death row cases.
Finally it proposes the idea of playing prior testimony through the court's own recording system, along with a possible instruction to inform the jury of the luxury of a read back.
The government denied the appellant's request to review his previous testimony before returning to complete his testimony.
In his testimony to grand jurors, Deputy District Attorney Max Huntsman said evidence suggested that Wong used Kaiser funds to curry favor with Edwards by financing the massages, even after Edwards described sexual activity during some of the sessions, the documents said.
The Virginia Court of Appeals, sitting en banc, acknowledged that Virginia allows lay testimony to support an insanity defense.
In the Request, Peyrelevade contends that interlocutory review is appropriate and necessary in this case because the ALJ's ruling improperly resolves a controlling issue of law by denying consideration of Peyrelevade's deposition testimony and by barring Peyrelevade from preserving his testimony by way of a testimonial deposition pursuant to Rule 263.
December's splashiest leak came from the world of baseball, where the secret grand jury testimony of seven-time National League Most Valuable Player Barry Bonds was published at length in the San Francisco Chronicle, triggering an anti-steroids outcry from the Golden Gate Bridge to the White House.
The convictions of the two mothers were obtained largely on expert testimony that the judges considered "unsafe.