tetanospasmin

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tetanospasmin

[‚tet·ən·ō′spaz·mən]
(biochemistry)
A neurotoxin elaborated by the bacterium Clostridium tetani and which is responsible for the manifestations of tetanus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Lalli et al., "Analysis of mutants of tetanus toxin HC fragment: ganglioside binding, cell binding and retrograde axonal transport properties," Molecular Microbiology, vol.
* Tetanus is diagnosed by clinical signs and history of recent trauma, demonstrating the presence of tetanus toxin in serum, and demonstration of the bacterium in Gram-stained smears, and by anaerobic culture when a wound is apparent.
The key elements in the management of tetanus include neutralization of tetanus toxin, wound debridement, antibiotic therapy, respiratory support and management of spasms and autonomic dysfunction (10).
Clostridium tetani can enter the body through a traumatic wound; the organism matures and produces the tetanus toxin. Possible sources are traumatic and suppurative wounds, dental infection, injections of illicit drugs, human and animal bites, frostbite, compound fractures, and gunshot wounds (Warms, 2004).
"Because I haven't seen any cases of tetanus in Newmarket for 20 years, and we vaccinate every horse against the tetanus toxin, we hit every foal with the vaccine, we flap about tetanus, but we never see it.
Doctors at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Barcelona said the tetanus toxin was being used to develop a vaccine for breast cancer and was now in trials.
But because both DTP and DTaP have been associated with severe (but not life-threatening) local reactions, serologic testing for specific IgG antibody to both diphtheria and tetanus toxin is reasonable (correlates of protection for pertussis are not established).
Few compounds bind to nerve endings as well as tetanus toxin. Put the poisonous protein almost anywhere in the body and it will find a peripheral nerve ending, then travel inside nerve cells to the central nervous system, where it eventually can lead to death.