tetrachloroethylene


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Related to tetrachloroethylene: trichloroethylene

tetrachloroethylene

[¦te·trə¦klȯr·ō′eth·ə‚lēn]
(organic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
Visual contrast sensitivity in children exposed to tetrachloroethylene.
1994, "Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene under aerobic conditions in a sediment column," Appl.
The paper examines the use of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor in the treatment of high strength wastewater containing tetrachloroethylene or perchloroethylene (PCE).
33 3-Methyl-2-butanone, 1-pentanol, 2,3-dichloro-l-propene, >30 1,2,4-tifluorobenzene, 1-butanol, 2-pentanol, 1,3-dichlorotetrafluoro-2-propanone, 1,4-dioxane, n-propyl acetate, methoxyflurane (pentrane), 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-chloroethyl-ethyl ether, dibromomethane, cyclopropyl methyl ketone, tetrachloroethylene, 2-Chloro-2-methyl-2-propanol Table 3.
Elizabeth's body also contained tetrachloroethylene, which is used in dry cleaning and has been linked to cancer.
The process has been used to remove tetrachloroethylene from the soil beneath what was once a dry cleaning business and the adjacent alley where the chemicals had spread.
Levels of tetrachloroethylene 9,400 times over its maximum allowed amount were detected at a plant of Matsushita Electronic Instrument Co.
All vinyl chloride is manufactured, or results from the breakdown of other manufactured substances, such as trichloroethylene, trichloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene.
The survey took measurements at least twice during the year, including summer and winter, of concentrations of 19 pollutants, including dioxin, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene and benzene, a carcinogen contained in gasoline.
Look for these dangers: arsenic released by metal smelting, coal burning and glass manufacturing: dioxins from paper and pulp bleaching and pesticide manufacturing; tetrachloroethylene (also known as "Perc") as used by dry cleaners; and hexachlorobenzene produced when making pesticides.
Yet, the most frequently occurring contaminants at Superfund sites, such as lead, trichloroethylene, benzene, chromium, and tetrachloroethylene, are chemicals with well-established toxic effects.
The two lists also include many of the organic compounds typically found in waste oil, organic binders, sea coal and coke, such as acetone, benzene, 2,4-dimethylphenol, ethylbenzene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, naphthalene, 2methylnapthalene, phenol, dimethyl phthalate, phenanthrene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, cresols, and xylenes.