tetrameter


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tetrameter

Prosody
1. a line of verse consisting of four metrical feet
2. a verse composed of such lines
3. (in classical prosody) a line of verse composed of four dipodies
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, we propose that Greek dimeter is unmarked in terms of binarity while Greek trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, and hexameter distinctively violate one or more constraints on binarity.
To be sure, here and elsewhere within the formal hodgepodge, one finds the inevitable excess of a forced meter or stretched rhyme, most frequently originating in some clank of the lofty and the vernacular that a genteel critic of the era would have described as the occasional poetic "fault." Still, in diction, rhyme, meter, and stanza pattern, Meek reveals a laudable, even adventurous willingness to let the music go where it needs to: to create a sudden couplet, for instance, where the rhyme has been alternating; to allow a couplet to spawn a triplet; to break from tetrameter into a concluding pentameter and even the occasional alexandrine.
The tetrameter rhythm of the poem's four-foot lines suggests the beat of the Puritans' oars on the water as they row toward Bermuda.
The distinctive quality of the trochaic tetrameter is its connection to song: this connection can be found in syllabo-tonic trochees and their syllabic analogues in various European languages and can presumably be explained because songs, in order to make the rhythm stand out, prefer a meter with a strong beat on the first syllable, without an anacrusis--in other words, a trochee rather than an iamb.
connects individuals via a bodily sensation." (20) Such patterned rhythm of iambic tetrameter and trimeter occurs in the fourth stanza: "And when at night she folded them / outside the wattle-fold, / She took her lute and sang to them / To keep them from the cold" (ll.
It is tightly organized, with a regular triple pulse and conventional tetrameter and pentameter lines.
Here, the first line is iambic tetrameter, with no trochaic first foot, and the second line is trimeter but with a dangling unstressed syllable.
Juster's "Rejection Note for Paradise Regained," where, in five tetrameter couplets, he caricatures a contemporary book publisher who urges Milton to "take a chance / on self-help or a gay romance" or a "phony" conspiracy: "Marketing knows you'll see the light, / and thinks Da Vinci is just right." Juster's "Revisionism" in six lines skewers divorce lawyers, who claim "six-figure fees / can fix what God has blundered."
Composed of 131 stanzas (four-line ABBA iambic tetrameter stanzas, called by critics In Memoriam Stanzas) and organized around three Christmas seasons, In Memoriam reflects the poets both painful and at other times optimistic thoughts over the death of his friend.
In the first stanza of Karl Gottfried von Leitner's "Der Winterabend," the poet first observes the peaceful descent of evening in two tetrameter lines each marked by a contemplative pause after the second foot.
In "The Rain at Sea," we encounter the image of a storm cloud above the sea "combing out its rain like wool, / like a girl her hair above a pool; / or else (all I could do was sit // before the scene, and worry it) / the sea reached up invisibly / to milk the ache out of the sky." While employing the iambic tetrameter couplet, Paterson avoids the great trap of the form, which is the slick click of trite, chiming language--certain, polished, dead.