tetrameter

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tetrameter

Prosody
1. a line of verse consisting of four metrical feet
2. a verse composed of such lines
3. (in classical prosody) a line of verse composed of four dipodies
References in periodicals archive ?
It is tightly organized, with a regular triple pulse and conventional tetrameter and pentameter lines.
And, although the iambic trimeters and tetrameters that create the waltz-like movement of the poem are perpetuated in the next two stanzas, the language has become static, "beneath your feet," "fallen," "crushed," "lies," "dead," "death," which reflects the situation of both the rose and the speaker who are trapped in this situation for as long as the dance--or the courtship that it may produce--lasts.
Poem 17, 'Ty ne skazhesh' komaru', is in trochaic tetrameter (T4).
The poem is in iambic tetrameter, and if Nathan had wanted to choose a Jewish synagogal melody of identical length and rhythm he had a wide choice, including one of the oldest and best known, the closing hymn of Sabbath and Festival services, Adon olam asher malakh/B'terem kol ye-tzir nivra.
Specifically, we propose that Greek dimeter is unmarked in terms of binarity while Greek trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, and hexameter distinctively violate one or more constraints on binarity.
into iambic pentameters, and tetrameters, entails still more careful
These essentials - levels of stress, tetrameters, feet (iambs to anapaests) - are concisely dealt with in Chapter 1.
The stanza consists of six lines rhyming aaabab of which the fourth and sixth are regularly iambic dimeters and the others iambic tetrameters, as in Burns's Holy Willie's Prayer:
It begins with three rhymed couplets in tetrameters, in each of which the first line is slightly irregular, and the second normally iambic.
Whilst the papist speaks in a rough mixture of pentameters and hexameters, the christian presents his argument in tetrameters which recall the frequently imitated style of Skelton's Colin Clout and Why Come Ye Nat To Court?
The chief writers of the day are described in rapid satiric profiles, written in what are often rough and uneven anapestic tetrameters that frequently close with startling rhymes.
All these tetrameters, like the 19th century iambs studied by Gasparov, have one common feature: a heightened stressing on the third SP.