Thalassemia

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thalassemia

[‚thal·ə′sē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
A hereditary form of hemolytic anemia resulting from a defective synthesis of hemoglobin: thalassemia major is the homozygous state accompanied by clinical illness, and thalassemia minor is the heterozygous state and may not have evident clinical manifestations. Also known as Mediterranean anemia.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Thalassemia

 

(also thalassanemia), a familial hemolytic anemia, first detected in 1925 among inhabitants of the Mediterranean region. Thalassemia is caused by disturbances in hemoglobin synthesis.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
showed that, by proper pharmacological stimulation, the steroidogenic function of the gonads and even ovulation can be reinstated in hypogonadal thalassemic women [12].
When a DNA study reveals a point mutation causing a single amino acid substitution in a patient with thalassemic hematologic features, we recommend that a careful Hb study be performed to estimate the relative concentration of the variant.
A severe case of Yersinia enterocolitica infection in a thalassemic patient.
This study demonstrated hypothyroidism in a significant number of hyper transfused b- thalassemic patients, who received suboptimal iron chelating therapy.
Attenuation of oxidative stress-induced changes in thalassemic erythrocytes by vitamin E.
Almost 70% families have more than one b- thalassemic child (two or three) and there may be carriers and even clinically normal children.
A study done among 142 HCV-infected Lebanese thalassemic patients identified HCV genotype 4 as the predominant genotype among thalassemic patients, which is in agreement with our results, and this confirms the predominance of HCV genotype 4 in our country and perhaps in the Middle East (21).
He went on to apply his extensive knowledge in molecular biology for prenatal diagnosis in thalassemic children and introduced screening not just at AIIMS but also at district hospitals."
A camp was also arranged to provide free thalassemic screening facility to students.
[8] Alloimmunization becomes one of the major complications in multiple transfused thalassemic patients.