thalidomide


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thalidomide

(thəlĭd`əmĭd'), sleep-inducing drug found to produce skeletal defects in developing fetuses. The drug was marketed in Europe, especially in West Germany and Britain, from 1957 to 1961, and was thought to be so safe that it was sold without prescription. In 1961 an extremely high incidence of European babies born with malformed, shortened limbs was correlated with use of thalidomide by women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Before it was recalled from use the drug had caused the malformation of about 8,000 children throughout the world.

Thalidomide never entirely disappeared from use, however, and it was later found to benefit some leprosyleprosy
or Hansen's disease
, chronic, mildly infectious malady capable of producing, when untreated, various deformities and disfigurements. It is caused by the rod-shaped bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, first described by G.
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 patients. In 1998, after a complex safety monitoring system had been established to prevent further birth defects, thalidomide was approved for use in the United States for a complication of leprosy. The drug is also used to treat multiple myeloma, a cancer that affects the bone marrow.

thalidomide

[thə′lid·ə‚mīd]
(pharmacology)
C13H10N2O4 A drug used as a sedative and hypnotic; may produce teratogenic effects when administered during pregnancy.

thalidomide

supposedly harmless sedative resulted in disfigured babies. [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 582–583]

thalidomide

a. a synthetic drug formerly used as a sedative and hypnotic but withdrawn from the market when found to cause abnormalities in developing fetuses. Formula: C13H10N2O4
b. (as modifier): a thalidomide baby
References in periodicals archive ?
More than 10,000 babies worldwide were born with limb deformities and other problems linked to Thalidomide.
After the eight-week trial, 13 of 28 kids taking thalidomide were in remission and five others had substantially fewer symptoms.
Diageo has always endeavoured to act responsibly and empathetically with respect to people injured by thalidomide, as evidenced by our continuing relationship with the UK Thalidomide Trust and the Australian Trust settlements of recent years.
Sue, who was born with 8ins arms and seven fingers after her mother took thalidomide in pregnancy, is the first person in the UK to qualify as a sports massage therapist using her feet.
It has also since expressed 'sincere regret' for the physical hardship and emotional difficulties faced by the families affected by thalidomide that was prescribed by the NHS.
Johnson writes: "We can see that thalidomide is not a random invention by a chemist working on his own.
The 50-year-old, who lives in Cardiff, was born with no arms or legs - as her autobiography states, she has four fingers, two sprouting from each shoulder and 13 toes on legs, which come to an abrupt end above the knee - after her pregnant mother Ellen Philomena, 18 at the time, was prescribed thalidomide.
Hagens Berman is representing several alleged thalidomide victims with such injuries who were previously unaware that thalidomide could have been the cause.
The firm won a multi-million dollar suit for 45 thalidomide victims in Australia and New Zealand against Britain s Diageo last year and claims to have uncovered evidence that drug makers knew more about the dangers than they let on.
The draft guidance recommends Thalidomide combination with two other drugs for people who cannot tolerate high-dose chemotherapy.
Velcade is recommended in combination with the two drugs if the patient cannot tolerate Thalidomide.