litany

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litany

(lĭt`ənē) [Gr.,=prayer], solemn prayer characterized by varying petitions with set responses. The term is mainly used for Christian forms. Litanies were developed in Christendom for use in processions. In the West there were traditionally four days for these processional litanies, the Rogation DaysRogation Days,
in the calendar of the Western Church, four days traditionally set apart for solemn processions to invoke God's mercy. They are Apr. 25, the Major Rogation, coinciding with St. Mark's Day; and the three days preceding Ascension Day, the Minor Rogations.
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. The Eastern liturgies make frequent use of litanies, recited by the deacon; the response is usually "Lord, have mercy." The Kyrie eleisonKyrie eleison
[Gr.,=Lord, have mercy], in the Roman Catholic Church, prayer of the Mass coming after the introit, the only ordinary part of the traditional liturgy said not in Latin but in Greek.
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 is a relic of such a litany. In the Roman Catholic Church the one liturgical litany, the Litany of the Saints, dates from the 5th cent. substantially. Modeled after it are a number of nonliturgical (i.e., nonprescribed) litanies, of which the following are authorized: Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus (15th cent.), Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary (or of Loreto; 16th cent.), Litany of the Sacred Heart, and Litany of St. Joseph. The litany in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer is much like the Litany of the Saints. Moravian and Lutheran liturgies also use litanies.

Litany

 

in Catholicism, a type of prayer that is sung or read during solemn religious processions.

litany

Christianity
a. a form of prayer consisting of a series of invocations, each followed by an unvarying response
b. the Litany the general supplication in this form included in the Book of Common Prayer
References in periodicals archive ?
2) In other words, his poem is an imagined public prayer, a la the litany, in which he speaks for and as part of the Christian community.
Angling light-filled yellow paper over white, the Litany for the Guardian Angels is dominated by hand-tinted, Xeroxed copies of the solemn Archangel Michael weighing a soul, from Rogier van der Weyden's Last Judgment.
In it, Lomborg analyzes the elements of the Litany, including those recited by Crews: (1)
Hares the litany of mistakes extreme prosperity induces.
At many parishes, a list of the deceased from the past year is included in the litany of saints.
A high-profile shooting incident in 1993 helped instigate the litany of lawsuits against firearm manufacturers by sundry cities, counties, and states.
According to the author, it is theoretically possible to make good use of the program if great vigilance is exercised, but she warns that "in tone and emphasis Renew 2000 booklets quickly lend themselves to the litany familiar at dissident Catholic gatherings.
The lessons of time and the litany of clubs that have come and gone--Xenon, Area, the Mudd Club, the Saint--merely demonstrate what true discomaniacs have known all along and what The Last Party proves beyond a doubt: You can't stop the music.
It appears that the litany of ills associated with smoking is growing, as we add to it cataracts, the world's leading cause of blindness," she writes in an editorial accompanying the two research reports in the Aug.
She recites the litany against blue-chip firms: the opulent offices, the overstaffing of cases, the gold-plated summer programs, the staggering bills.
We are all familiar with the Litany," he writes: "The environment is in poor shape here on earth.