seraglio

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Seraglio:

see İstanbul Turkey.

seraglio

1. An enclosed or protected place.
2. A palace.

seraglio

, serail
1. the harem of a Muslim house or palace
2. a sultan's palace, esp in the former Turkish empire
3. the wives and concubines of a Muslim
References in periodicals archive ?
concerted attempts to subvert the seraglio system, as befits any attempt
The former remained posted at the entrances of the seraglio to inspect whoever entered or left the gates.
Chariton pieces together an imaginative geography of the East that is symbolized by sensual women of the seraglio and the despotic but curiously compelling King.
26 The influential French traveller, Francois Bernier, also emphasised "the enormous expenses of the seraglio, where the consumption of fine clothes of gold, and brocade, silks, embroideries, pearls, musk, amber and sweet essences, is greater than can be conceived.
After she escapes from the seraglio and takes a fourth lover, the Arab Amar, who's as comforting as Belqassim had been disturbing, she begs Amar to save her.
Belmonte is the Spanish nobleman who arrives on the Barbary coast determined to find and rescue his bride-to-be Konstanze, who was captured by pirates and confined in the seraglio, or harem, of the formidable Turkish pasha Selim.
In painters such as Thomas Hope, Eugene Delacroix, Alexandre Gabriel Decamps, and John Frederick Lewis; in painters who wrote about the Orient including Leon Belly, Alfred Dhodencq, and Gustave Guillaumet; in Charles Cordier's sculpture; in Mozart's The Abduction from the Seraglio and The Magic Flute; and even in the writings of Rudyard Kipling, Ibn Warraq finds a powerful determination to convey the color, texture, and, most of all, the humanity of the men and women of the East.
It will be performed on May 17 and is in the middle of a five-night run which also features Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin and Mozart's The Seraglio.
The problem lies largely with the refurbished sets, borrowed from a recent Salzburg production of Mozart's "Abduction From the Seraglio," of all things.
Toward the end of the season Mahler also conducted Mozart (The Abduction from the Seraglio, Cosd' fan tutte), Marschner (Hans Heiling), Lortzing (Undine), Meyerbeer (Der Prophet), Gluck (IphigenieinAulis in Wagner's edition), Weber (The Freeshooter) and Beethoven (Fidelio).
In the original arrangement the Seraglio was adjacent to the artist's studio, perhaps referencing the sexualization of female models.