Sudetenland

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Sudetenland,

former region, Czechoslovakia: see under SudetesSudetes
, Czech Sudety, Ger. Sudeten, mountain range, along the border of the Czech Republic and Poland, extending c.185 mi (300 km) between the Elbe and Oder rivers. It is continued on the W by the Erzgebirge and on the E by the Carpathians.
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Sudetenland

a mountainous region of the N Czech Republic: part of Czechoslovakia (1919--38; 1945--93); occupied by Germany (1938--45)
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, at two different places, he did make some vague references to the Sudeten German case, and to the Congress trying to create "a serious situation which will break India vertically and horizontally", warning the Congress at the same time to "mark, learn and inwardly digest" the lessons provided by Sudeten Germans.
Svasek, "Narratives of 'Home' and 'Homeland': The Symbolic Construction and Appropriation of the Sudeten German Heimat," Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power 9, no.
Germany annexed the Sudeten area of Czechoslovakia following the 1938 Munich Agreement and then invaded the rest of the country in March 1939.
Twenty-nine chapters examine such topics as the role of the Versailles Treaty that ended the First World War, the failure of the League of Nations, the ideology of Japanese imperial militarism, Italian foreign policy before the war, German-French relations, German military traditions, the policies of the British Foreign Secretaries of the 1930s, the policies of the European neutral powers, international dimensions of the Spanish Civil War, developments in the Middle East, the "Jewish Question" and its impact on international affairs, the Sudeten Crisis of 1938, the policies of Joseph Stalin, and economic explanations for the origins of war.
In August 1938, in the midst of the Sudeten crisis, Gen Joseph Vuillemin, general chief of staff of the air force, went to Germany at the invitation of Hermann Goring.
on the Expulsion of the Sudeten Germans (Munich: University Press,1953).
He claims that if Israel withdraws from the West Bank, Israel will become a ghetto with Auschwitz borders, as taking the West Bank out of Israel's control is tantamount to Hitler's seizure of the Sudeten district from Czechoslovakia in 1938.
Slightly less well-known are three stories which illustrate the confusion that Eastern Europeans and Germans feel about their pasts: the recovery of war dead in the former East Germany, the post-war use of concentration camps, and the issue of the Sudeten Germans.
From 1936 performances for the Sudeten German Party, if to a lesser extent, start to appear in the records.
How horrible fantastic incredible it is that we should be digging trenches and trying on gas masks here because of a quarrel in a far-away country between people of whom we know nothing said the British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain in a radio broadcast in September 1938 referring to the Sudeten crisis.
The Poles immediately set about kicking all of the Germans out of their new territory as did the Czechs in the case of the Sudeten Germans.