the dandelion

the dandelion

People often confuse the many similar cousins in this family, all of them edible. The whole plant is edible, they have a yellow “dandelion flower” on top, edible leaves, milky sap in the stems and edible roots. They all look very similar when young. When they are allowed to “grow up” is when they start showing their true differences. As with most plants, the greens are best eaten when young. The older and taller the plant becomes, the tougher and more bitter it is. Constantly cutting the plants down short keeps this from happening. The young stems, when peeled can be eaten like asparagus. The roots can be used as a coffee substitute (along with chicory) This group is very cleansing to the body, especially the kidneys, and they help promote digestion because of their bitter taste, which also helps clean the liver. Almost all dandelion-like plants are edible, except Groundsel which has flower buds that never open.
References in classic literature ?
Before their advent the dandelion wine had been served in sherry glasses.
But in the beautifully plumed seed of the dandelion, and in the flattened and fringed legs of the water-beetle, the relation seems at first confined to the elements of air and water.
Love may, as Shakespeare said, feed on itself: but Sarah could not bring herself to eat the dandelions that had graced, as ornaments, the first spiritual banquet of her heart's true affection.
The sugar on the bread and butter has lost its charm, but I love the dandelions and daisies even more passionately now than then, and never would endure to see them all mown away if I were not certain that in a day or two they would be pushing up their little faces again as jauntily as ever.
Standing up thus against the large low moon, the daisies really seemed to be giant daisies, the dandelions to be giant dandelions.
Then, the dandelion turned to white fluff and some of her blowing seeds arrived at another lovely meadow to grow and live in a different natural setting, with a small family farm that practiced sustainability in its living.
The Dandelion Fountain, on Roanne Ringway, is "the epitome of the perfect one-way gyratory", says the organisation behind the gongs, The UK Roundabout Appreciation Society.
The dandelion fountain will be a familiar sight for people driving through the town, mainly because the road it sits on, the A444, is regularly gridlocked.
In your March/April 2016 issue, we were delighted to see the article on the Dandelion Cottage in Marquette.
Told in first person, a little girl is upset when her practical father mows the lawn and gets rid of the dandelion weeds.
When the girl asks her father where the dandelion seeds really go, he gives her a magical answer.