the dandelion

the dandelion

People often confuse the many similar cousins in this family, all of them edible. The whole plant is edible, they have a yellow “dandelion flower” on top, edible leaves, milky sap in the stems and edible roots. They all look very similar when young. When they are allowed to “grow up” is when they start showing their true differences. As with most plants, the greens are best eaten when young. The older and taller the plant becomes, the tougher and more bitter it is. Constantly cutting the plants down short keeps this from happening. The young stems, when peeled can be eaten like asparagus. The roots can be used as a coffee substitute (along with chicory) This group is very cleansing to the body, especially the kidneys, and they help promote digestion because of their bitter taste, which also helps clean the liver. Almost all dandelion-like plants are edible, except Groundsel which has flower buds that never open.
References in classic literature ?
But in the beautifully plumed seed of the dandelion, and in the flattened and fringed legs of the water-beetle, the relation seems at first confined to the elements of air and water.
Before their advent the dandelion wine had been served in sherry glasses.
Love may, as Shakespeare said, feed on itself: but Sarah could not bring herself to eat the dandelions that had graced, as ornaments, the first spiritual banquet of her heart's true affection.
The sugar on the bread and butter has lost its charm, but I love the dandelions and daisies even more passionately now than then, and never would endure to see them all mown away if I were not certain that in a day or two they would be pushing up their little faces again as jauntily as ever.
Standing up thus against the large low moon, the daisies really seemed to be giant daisies, the dandelions to be giant dandelions.
To be honest, the way the dandelion grows in all sorts of places does not strike me as weedy - it is pretty rough and tough in my opinion.
Oh, and the bulk of the dandelion's carbohydrate content is dietary fiber.
Researchers suggest that the dandelion's porous parachute might inspire the development of small-scale drones that require little or no power consumption.
The dandelion was ground to a powder and soaked in different concentrations and volumes of solvents (water, ethanol, methanol, and chloroform), mixed and left to stand.
But when all else fails on the dandelion front, the low-tech method of dig and pull can still come through in the clutch.
Every part of the dandelion is useful with the root, leaves, and flowers used for food, medicine and dye.