Herd

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Related to the herd instinct: Herd behavior

herd

a large group of mammals living and feeding together, esp a group of cattle, sheep, etc.

Herd

 

a group of beef cattle.

Animals in a herd are selected according to sex, age, liveweight, and fattiness. Herds are formed during the zootechnical and veterinary examination of the cattle before the beginning of pasturing. The size of the herds in meat sovkhozes is 150–200 head of younger animals, 150–200 head of fattened adult animals in steppe regions, and 100–150 in forest and forest-steppe regions. Each herd is managed by a team of two to four herdsmen.


Herd

 

(1) A group of mammals of the same species with interdependent behavior; that is, they remain close to one another for a significant period of time, behave similarly, often have the same rhythm of activity (for example, the simultaneous diving of whales), and travel in the same direction. Herd formation is characteristic of cetaceans, artiodactyls, perissodactyls, and monkeys. The composition (in terms of age and sex) and size of a herd fluctuate, thereby distinguishing herds from other groups of animals with interdependent behavior, for example, families and harems.

The maximum size of a herd is determined by the possibilities for mutual coordination of behavior. A herd may consist of dozens of individuals among whales and monkeys and 1,500 to 2,000 individuals among ungulates (for example, reindeer, saiga, and gnu). The largest herds are formed during seasonal migrations, after which they break up into smaller groups (families, harems). The animals in a herd orient themselves by the behavior of their neighbors (signals of the presence of food, appearance of a predator). Following the example of its leader, a herd may select a safer route during flight from a predator or during travel toward a watering place or shelter, especially during the migration period. Imitation of nearby individuals predominates in the behavior of many herd members over free decision-making, which is characteristic of solitary animals.

When animals are in a herd they permit man to approach fairly closely and possibly to control them. The patterns of herd behavior are widely used in pasture livestock raising, since domesticated hoofed animals are usually gregarious.

L. M. BASKIN

(2) A group of animals kept together on a farm for maintenance, fattening, or pasturing, for example, a herd of beef cattle or a herd of horses.

(3) The total number of animals of one species on a farm. The composition (sex, age, and production groups of animals), purpose, and periods of use of a herd vary with the organizational and economic conditions of herd reproduction. The necessary composition is maintained by planned rotation of the herd.

herd

[hərd]
(vertebrate zoology)
A number of one kind of wild, semidomesticated, or domesticated animals grouped or kept together under human control.
References in periodicals archive ?
The force of Trotter's work on the herd instinct as the origin of human association, then, was based not only on its futures-oriented argument for progressive social change, but on his situating of the force of convention as an obstacle to that innovation which derived from human gregariousness as expressed in altruistic action.
In his final two essays published in the 1915 and 1919, Trotter elaborated the role of gregariousness in human sociality to argue that the sensitiveness to others which emerged from the herd instinct led naturally to pacifism and internationalism and that an understanding of human association and the possibility of evolutionary social change pointed to a scientific model of statecraft designed to adjust the environment in order to unleash the creative potential inherent in sensitiveness and overcome a rigid class structure.
As such, real assets are less prone (but not immune from) the herd instinct driving prices up or down.
It reflects the unfairness, the herd instinct, the bullying nature and the "end justifies the means" mentality of so much that goes on in the wider world.
The herd instinct is always strong in punters and, with the usual motley crew of TV prats to guide them, we can expect plenty of value on the exchanges, particularly in running.
Thus, there was nothing to dig up against the administration, and the herd instinct in the media never was activated.
Horses with his tendency to idle do so partly as a result of the herd instinct and partly because they have already fulfilled the command to run away from their rivals.
Given the power of the herd instinct in all financial markets, an understanding of mass psychology would probably be of more use.
Call it the herd instinct, call it bravery, call it stupidity but somehow 430 people - a record turnout - resist the urge to stop running and instead plunge neck-deep into the December sea.
The markets could behave 'very abruptly', particularly when the herd instinct takes over.
Donald Fernie to comment that "the definitive study of the herd instincts of astronomers has yet to be written.