sick

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sick

1. inclined or likely to vomit
2. 
a. suffering from ill health
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the sick
3. 
a. of, relating to, or used by people who are unwell
b. (in combination): sickbed
4. deeply affected with a mental or spiritual feeling akin to physical sickness
5. mentally, psychologically, or spiritually disturbed
6. an informal word for vomit
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
After a few minutes' bustle beside the high bedstead, those who had carried the sick man dispersed.
The sick man was turned on to his side with his face to the wall.
"The glass!" snapped the sick woman, falling back on her pillow.
On the way back to the bed she stopped, eyeing the sick woman with a critical gaze.
"Humph!" grunted the sick woman, eyeing her reflection severely.
Conspicu- ous, both for location and personal outfit, stood Marinel, a hermit of the quack-doctor species, to introduce the sick. All abroad over the spacious floor, and clear down to the doors, in a thick jumble, lay or sat the scrofulous, under a strong light.
A priest pronounced the words, "They shall lay their hands on the sick, and they shall recover." Then the king stroked the ulcers, while the reading continued; finally, the patient graduated and got his nickel -- the king hanging it around his neck himself -- and was dismissed.
In her room in the shabby old hotel the sick wife of the hotel keeper began to weep and, putting her hands to her face, rocked back and forth.
Later she wondered if the hours alone with the sick man had not led to her decision to marry.
A new will teach I unto men: to choose that path which man hath followed blindly, and to approve of it--and no longer to slink aside from it, like the sick and perishing!
He had said he would fetch his wife, but now, taking stock of the emotion he was feeling, he decided that he would try on the contrary to persuade her not to go in to the sick man.
It had never occurred to Father Sergius that he could cure the sick. He would have regarded such a thought as a great sin of pride; but the mother who brought the boy implored him insistently, falling at his feet and saying: