theatre


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theatre

(US), theater
1. 
a. a building designed for the performance of plays, operas, etc.
b. (as modifier): a theatre ticket
2. a room in a hospital or other medical centre equipped for surgical operations
3. plays regarded collectively as a form of art
4. the theatre the world of actors, theatrical companies, etc.
5. writing that is suitable for dramatic presentation
6. US, Austral, NZ the usual word for cinema
7. a circular or semicircular open-air building with tiers of seats
http://vl-theatre.com
www.theatrelinks.com
www.uktw.co.uk
www.artslynx.org/theatre
References in classic literature ?
This thought hath been carried so far, and is become so general, that some words proper to the theatre, and which were at first metaphorically applied to the world, are now indiscriminately and literally spoken of both; thus stage and scene are by common use grown as familiar to us, when we speak of life in general, as when we confine ourselves to dramatic performances: and when transactions behind the curtain are mentioned, St James's is more likely to occur to our thoughts than Drury-lane.
Presently he hailed a tall, bearded man, grim-browed and rather battered-looking, who had his opera cloak on his arm and his hat in his hand, and who seemed to be on the point of leaving the theatre.
A man who is the successful manager of a theatre is probably the last man in the civilized universe who is capable of being impressed with favourable opinions of his fellow-creatures.
Happily for him, a love of the theatre is so general, an itch for acting so strong among young people, that he could hardly out-talk the interest of his hearers.
In the vignettes of the Bear-garden and the Swan Theatre, for instance, the artist has managed to throw over his minute plate a wonderful air of pleasantness, a light which, though very delicate, is very theatrical.
We will not have to think of anything, save when, in any theatre or place of entertainment, a trained-animal turn is presented before us.
His besetting sin gained so fast upon him, however, that it was found impossible to employ him in the situations in which he really was useful to the theatre. The public-house had a fascination for him which he could not resist.
I see; then you were at the theatre tonight, and it was your umb--'
I went first to the barrier separating us from the stalls, and looked for the Count in that part of the theatre. He was not there.
Utterson's nerves, at this unlooked-for termination, gave a jerk that nearly threw him from his balance; but he recollected his courage and followed the butler into the laboratory building through the surgical theatre, with its lumber of crates and bottles, to the foot of the stair.
These incidents had made the memory of his last talk with Madame Olenska so vivid to the young man that as the curtain fell on the parting of the two actors his eyes filled with tears, and he stood up to leave the theatre.
And what chance would I have in the theatre or afterward?