ablation

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Related to Thermal ablation: Endometrial ablation

ablation

1. Medicine the surgical removal of an organ, structure, or part
2. Astronautics the melting or wearing away of an expendable part, such as the heat shield of a space re-entry vehicle on passing through the earth's atmosphere
3. Geology the wearing away of a rock or glacier

ablation

(ab-lay -shŏn) The loss of material from the surface of a moving body as a result of vaporization, friction, etc. For example, atmospheric atoms and molecules erode the surface of a meteoroid and damage the protective heat shield of a returning space shuttle.

Ablation

 

in glaciology, the wasting of the mass of a glacier or snow cover as a result of thawing, evaporation, or mechanical removal—for example, wind ablation or the falling of icebergs. It is caused chiefly by climatic factors.

Three types of ablation are distinguished according to place of appearance: subglacial (or bottom), internal, and surface. The internal heat of the earth, springs (particularly warm ones) surfacing in the glacier bed, and heat caused by the friction of the glacier in its bed are some of the causes of subglacial ablation. Internal ablation is caused by friction between the glacier components and by the circulation of water and air. The glacier surface receives warmth predominantly from solar radiation and from the air. The thermal balance of the glacier surface is the basis of all surface ablation processes. The term “ablation” is sometimes used as well as a synonym for “surface washoff.”

ablation

[ə′blā·shən]
(aerospace engineering)
The intentional removal of material from a nose cone or spacecraft during high-speed movement through a planetary atmosphere to provide thermal protection to the underlying structure.
(geology)
The wearing away of rocks, as by erosion or weathering.
(hydrology)
The reduction in volume of a glacier due to melting and evaporation.
(medicine)
The removal of tissue or a part of the body by surgery, such as by excision or amputation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dupuy, "Thermal ablation of tumours: biological mechanisms and advances in therapy," Nature Reviews Cancer, vol.
Conductive thermal ablation of 4T1 murine breast carcinoma reduces severe hypoxia in surviving tumour.
Thiriet, "Simulation study on acoustic streaming and convective cooling in blood vessels during a high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation," International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol.
Chen, "Randomised controlled trial comparing percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation, percutaneous ethanol injection, and percutaneous acetic acid injection to treat hepatocellular carcinoma of 3 cm or less," Gut, vol.
In fact, the higher input power values (30 W and 50 W) had the higher reached temperatures; just when low input powers (10 W and 20 W) were applied during longer times (120 s and 40 s), the reached temperatures were in the range for thermal ablation. It is important to remark that temperatures over 100[degrees]C can be reached because, although the models include tissue perfusion and metabolism, the thermal dependence of this was not taken into account.
One of the main shortcomings of MW thermal ablation (MTA) is the lack of a reliable temperature monitoring system.
Acquired diaphragmatic defect is a rare complication of microwave ablation (MWA), a form of thermal ablation treatment for cancer, commonly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [7, 8].
Recent reports highlighted a possible effect of thermal ablation on immunomodulation other than simple tumor destruction [13].
The applications of thermal ablation to treat thyroid benign nodules showed obvious advantages [5-10].
A great number of methods have been described in the treatment of OO including a wide spectrum ranging from seldom-used conservative approach with NSAIDs over minimally invasive percutaneous treatments (mechanical, chemical or thermal ablation) to open surgical methods (en bloc resections and curettage techniques) (9-21).