thermal horsepower

thermal horsepower

[′thər·məl ′hȯrs‚pau̇·ər]
(electricity)
Electrical motor horsepower as determined by current readings from a thermal-type ammeter; will be higher than load horsepower determined from kilowatt-input methods. Also known as true motor load.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
DFC clutches are capable of speeds up to 1200 rpm and thermal horsepower dissipation of up to 10 horsepower.
Thermal horsepower is the brake's ability to dissipate generated heat, and is probably the most important characteristic of a clutch or brake.
This allows pneumatic solutions to offer thermal horsepower as high as 0.14, while a comparable electric unit can only achieve a rating of approximately 0.10.
One-eighth-inch copper tubing was helically wrapped around, and silver-soldered to, a 1/4-inch-outside-diameter copper "flame tube." The first helical test boiler weighed 8 ounces and produced 5 to 7 thermal horsepower of superheated steam at 80 pounds per square inch and 700 [degrees] F.
In the case of selections in which the thermal horsepower rating is exceeded by the actual load, a fan or heat exchanger, or a larger reducer may be required.
The single-piston design prevents overlap between the clutch and brake, while the open housing allows for increased thermal horsepower.
Oil-shear tension-control brakes with forced lube cooling are rated up to 27,000 ft-lbs slip torque and 1500 thermal horsepower. Standard clutch brakes are rated up to 24,000 in-lbs and 25 thermal horsepower.
A note of caution when selecting a worm-gear reducer: if the manufacturer lists thermal horsepower ratings as well as equivalent horsepower ratings, do not confuse the two.

Full browser ?