thermal storage wall

thermal storage wall

Consists of a 10- to 16-inch thick masonry wall placed on the south side of a building where it will receive the most sunlight. Dark-colored, single- or double-glazed windows cover the exterior of the wall to absorb the solar energy, which is stored and then radiated to the living area after the space cools. For other thermal wall systems, the wall thickness varies depending on the material: 10–14 inches for brick, 12–16 inches for concrete, and 8–12 inches for adobe. See also: Passive solar design

passive solar energy system

A building subsystem in which solar energy is collected and transferred predominantly by natural means; uses natural convection, conduction, or radiation to distribute thermal energy through a structure, within the limits of the indoor design temperature conditions. Compare with active solar energy system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Were we to build another greenhouse against the same requirements, we would have a rear thermal storage wall with a maximum height of eight feet, or even less.
Thermal Storage Wall Design Manual, by Alex Wilson (New Mexico Solar Energy Association, Box 2004.
Some designers integrate windows into the thermal storage walls to permit some daylighting to enter the rooms located behind these walls, as shown in Photograph 7.
The Dickensons use a four-inch concrete slab floor and eight-inch concrete block thermal storage walls to store the heat in their home.