thermoacoustic effect

thermoacoustic effect

[¦thər·mō·ə¦kü·stik i′fekt]
(physics)
Any effect that arises from the combination of the pressure oscillations of a sound wave with the accompanying adiabatic temperature oscillations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results have shown that, for step change in wall temperature, the thermoacoustic effect induces a sharp wavefront with a large pressure amplitude, while gradual heating results in much lower pressure amplitudes.
Carbon nanotube (CNT) speakers are a new type of non-moving, ultra-light-weight, flexible, and stretchable thin-film loudspeaker that produce sound with the thermoacoustic effect. Alternating current passes through the electrodes to the low heat capacity CNT thin film changing the surface temperature rapidly.
Carbon Nanotube (CNT) thin film speakers are a new type of speakers that produce sound via thermoacoustic effect. Because of the low heat capacity of the CNT thin film, the temperature of it can change very fast by applying the AC current through it.
The heating produced by the absorption of US energy (the thermoacoustic effect) affects mass diffusion.
However, for processes useful for dark matter (in the range of 10-100 keV), the emitted sound predicted by the thermoacoustic effect is not detectable.
Wang, "Numerical study of microwave-induced thermoacoustic effect for early breast cancer detection," IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium, 2005.
Ali Aliev and colleagues explained that thin films of nanotubes can generate sound waves via a thermoacoustic effect. Every time that an electrical pulse passes through the microscopic layer of carbon tubes, the air around them heats up and creates a sound wave.
Ali Aliev and colleagues explain that thin films of nanotubes can generate sound waves via a thermoacoustic effect.
the thermoacoustic effect in simple, reliable, low-cost, environmentally
The thermoacoustic effect is surprisingly simple, according to Steven
People first recorded their observations of naturally occurring thermoacoustic effects almost 150 years ago, when they noticed that a cool glass tube would often sing when brought in contact with a hot bulb This effect, wherein heat energy is converted to sound energy, is the reverse of a thermoacoustic cooling process.